What Is An Attitude Of Jesus Christ?

VERSE OF THE DAY

Philippians 2:5-8 (New Living Translation)

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You must have the same attitude that Christ Jesus had. Though he was God, he did not think of equality with God as something to cling to. Instead, he gave up his divine privileges; he took the humble position of a slave and was born as a human being. When he appeared in human form, he humbled himself in obedience to God and died a criminal’s death on a cross.

You must have the humble attitude of Christ Jesus and though he was God and was pure innocents he humbled to human form to his father God and died a criminals death by death on the cross

Bible Question:

Can you explain in layman terms what Philippians 2:5-8 mean?

Bible Answer:

Philippians 2:5-8 is one of the most important passages in the New Testament because it reveals that Jesus was not just a man and He was not just God – He is both!

Have this attitude in yourselves which was also in Christ Jesus, who, although He existed in the form of God, did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Philippians 2:5-8 (NASB)

Jesus Is God

Philippians 2:6 says that Jesus is God.

. . . who, although He existed in the form of God, did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped . . . Philippians 2:6 (NASB)

What do the words mean? The first important word is “form.” An English dictionary will not give us the meaning of this word. The Greek word for “form” is morphe which means that Jesus did not look like God on the outside but was completely God on the inside. It means that Jesus possessed the attributes of God. The sense of the word “existed” means that Jesus was continuously existing as God. He did not cease to be God even when He came to earth.

Jesus Is Man

When Jesus lived on this earth, why did He tell the disciples that He did not know when the end of the world would come in Matthew 24:35-36?

Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away. No-one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.  Matthew 24:35-36 (NASB)

If He is God, how can this be true? The answer is found in the next verse of Philippians 2:7.

. . . but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men. Philippians 2:7 (NASB)

The Greek word for “emptied” is kenoo which means that the second person of the Trinity, the Word, gave up something when He became a man. This means that the Word decided to limit the use of His divine attributes in order to live as a human being, as Jesus. He limited the use of His knowledge (Matthew 24:35-36) and wisdom (Luke 2:52) for example. Nor did He look like God on the outside. At the Mount of Transfiguration, His Shekinah glory was displayed for a short moment in time (Matthew 17:1-5; John 17:5).  The verse also says that Jesus was just like a man in that He had the attributes of a man; yet, He was without sin (Hebrews 4:15)! That is the meaning of the words “form” or morphe and “likeness” or homoioma which also means “appearance or image.” He was both God and man.

Jesus Humbled Himself

Philippians 2:8 says that Jesus looked like a man outwardly. He was God and man on the inside; but He looked like a man on the outside.

And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Philippians 2:8 (NASB)

Why did He do this? So that he could die for you and me! As a result, He can forgive our sins so that we can go to heaven.

Conclusion:

What is humility? It is submission. That is what Jesus did. Jesus submitted to the point of death on that cross. He lived a human life so that He could understand us experientially (Hebrews 2:17-18). He became like us in order to die for us (1 Peter 2:24) so that He could forgive our sins if we believe in Him (John 3:16). More information can be found in the study “Jesus, Our Savior.

What does Philippians 2:5 mean?

This verse serves to set up the poetic description of verses 6–11. The mind Paul refers to is the focus of Christ’s life, which is humility. Paul clearly feels this is something the Philippian believers have, or at least have access to, as Christians. The attitude of a believer is to resemble the attitude of Christ. This is made clear in the verses to follow.

In the upcoming passage, Paul will describe how Christ, though God, took the form of a servant, was born human, lived obediently, and died innocently on a cross (Philippians 2:6–8). His humility led to being exalted or lifted up (Philippians 2:9). In a similar way, believers are to live humbly after the example of Jesus. Doing so will please God, and result in our eternal benefit. Paul’s focus on the “mind” is clear here and elsewhere in this letter. The Philippians were to have one mind (Philippians 1:27; 2:2). They were not to set their minds on earthly things (Philippians 3:19). In addition, the peace of God would guard their hearts and minds in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:7). The mind that follows Christ produces a life that obeys Christ.

Context Summary

Philippians 2:1–5 connects the blessings of Christianity with corresponding results in a Christian’s life. We experience comfort, encouragement, love, and unity as saved believers in Christ. As a result, we ought to express comfort, encouragement, love, and unity to our fellow believers. Here again, Paul emphasizes that how a Christian thinks—how they frame their attitude—is crucial to living a Christian life. This sets up a classic description of Jesus Christ’s sacrifice on our behalf, starting in verse 6.

Chapter Summary

Paul describes Jesus Christ as one willing to be humble, in obedience to God the Father. For this, God will exalt Jesus’ name above all others. Someday, one way or another, all people will admit that Jesus Christ is Lord, and submit to Him. Paul wants the Philippian believers to live with contentment and unity, without complaining. Instructions are given regarding two visitors. The first is actually the one delivering this letter, Epaphroditus. The other is Timothy, Paul’s trusted friend, who hopefully will be visiting soon

What does Philippians 2:6 mean?

Many Bible translations offset verses 6–11, since they follow a poetic structure used in early hymns in the church. The beginning of this verse refers to Jesus as being “in the form of God.” In other words, Jesus and God are equal. Contrary to skeptics who claim the divinity of Jesus was “invented” later in church history, Paul frequently addressed Jesus as divine in his letters.

The second part of this verse notes the stark contrast between how Jesus could have behaved, and how He actually lived. He could have come to earth to demand every person grovel in front of Him. Instead of treating others as His servants, He became a servant to the people He had created. Again, the emphasis on “equality with God” clearly shows Paul’s belief that Jesus is equal with God the Father. Yet Jesus did not “grasp” or hold on to His positional authority. He instead came humbly as a servant, giving His life to serve others.

Context Summary

Philippians 2:6–11 is a poetic description of Jesus’ willingness to humble Himself for our sake. Rather than coming first as God and King, Jesus freely took on the form of a human being. He was humiliated and oppressed, following the will of the Father, in order to be the sacrifice for our sins. As a result, ”Jesus” will be given the ultimate glory and honor. Eventually, all people, whether they want to or not, will admit that Jesus Christ is, in fact, Lord. For some, this will happen too late.

Chapter Summary

Paul describes Jesus Christ as one willing to be humble, in obedience to God the Father. For this, God will exalt Jesus’ name above all others. Someday, one way or another, all people will admit that Jesus Christ is Lord, and submit to Him. Paul wants the Philippian believers to live with contentment and unity, without complaining. Instructions are given regarding two visitors. The first is actually the one delivering this letter, Epaphroditus. The other is Timothy, Paul’s trusted friend, who hopefully will be visiting soon

What does Philippians 2:7 mean?

Rather than coming to earth to demand others serve Him, Jesus “emptied himself.” This does not mean Jesus stopped being God. Rather than coming the first time as a king, Jesus chose not to exhibit His unlimited powers. He came to serve rather to be served (Matthew 20:28; Mark 10:45). He chose the “form” of a servant rather than the “form” of God (Philippians 2:6).

One way Jesus came as a servant was taking on the limitations of a human body. Though eternal, Jesus entered earth as an infant. He was born to His mother Mary, who remained a virgin until His birth (Matthew 1:25). He was born in a humble situation, coming into this world among the animals in a stable, and sleeping in a feed trough (Luke 2:1–7). The first people to visit Him were not kings, but shepherds (Luke 2:8–20). His birth was common, yet His life was anything but common. His humility is emphasized in this verse as the example believers are to follow.

Context Summary

Philippians 2:6–11 is a poetic description of Jesus’ willingness to humble Himself for our sake. Rather than coming first as God and King, Jesus freely took on the form of a human being. He was humiliated and oppressed, following the will of the Father, in order to be the sacrifice for our sins. As a result, ”Jesus” will be given the ultimate glory and honor. Eventually, all people, whether they want to or not, will admit that Jesus Christ is, in fact, Lord. For some, this will happen too late.

Chapter Summary

Paul describes Jesus Christ as one willing to be humble, in obedience to God the Father. For this, God will exalt Jesus’ name above all others. Someday, one way or another, all people will admit that Jesus Christ is Lord, and submit to Him. Paul wants the Philippian believers to live with contentment and unity, without complaining. Instructions are given regarding two visitors. The first is actually the one delivering this letter, Epaphroditus. The other is Timothy, Paul’s trusted friend, who hopefully will be visiting soon

What does Philippians 2:8 mean?

The first phrase here completes the thought begun in verse 7: that Jesus came to earth in human form as a servant. In addition, Jesus both was born and died in humility. His humbleness was not for show, but was part of being “obedient.” In a similar way, Paul encouraged his readers to be humble in obedience to Christ, following both the example of Jesus and of Paul.

The last phrase of this verse refers to the horrific death of crucifixion. The cross was clearly a symbol of death in first century culture. Paul’s mention of it here reminds us that the cross was more than a painful death. It was also a degrading, humiliating form of execution. Jesus did not die as a hero on a battlefield, but instead died innocently and shamefully in public view outside the city walls of Jerusalem. He was mocked, yet endured scorn as part of God’s plan for His life as a sacrifice for sinners.

Context Summary

Philippians 2:6–11 is a poetic description of Jesus’ willingness to humble Himself for our sake. Rather than coming first as God and King, Jesus freely took on the form of a human being. He was humiliated and oppressed, following the will of the Father, in order to be the sacrifice for our sins. As a result, ”Jesus” will be given the ultimate glory and honor. Eventually, all people, whether they want to or not, will admit that Jesus Christ is, in fact, Lord. For some, this will happen too late.

Chapter Summary

Paul describes Jesus Christ as one willing to be humble, in obedience to God the Father. For this, God will exalt Jesus’ name above all others. Someday, one way or another, all people will admit that Jesus Christ is Lord, and submit to Him. Paul wants the Philippian believers to live with contentment and unity, without complaining. Instructions are given regarding two visitors. The first is actually the one delivering this letter, Epaphroditus. The other is Timothy, Paul’s trusted friend, who hopefully will be visiting soon

Author: J. Palmer

Living under the wings of God and the angels around me keeping me going and safe. Sharing the love of Christ.

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