I Am The Bread Of Life

VERSE OF THE DAY

John 6:35 (New Living Translation)

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Jesus replied, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry again. Whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.

Jesus said I am the bread of life you shall not be hungry for I feed you the word of life. Whoever believes in me will not be thirsty for I am the living water

35 Then Jesus declared, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty. 36 But as I told you, you have seen me and still you do not believe.Mar 1, 2018

Why Is Jesus Called the ‘Bread of Life’?

After Jesus feeds the 5,000 with five loaves and two fish, He tells them “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger and whoever believes in me shall never thirst” (John 6:35). The bread of life is not physical bread, but the bread of spiritual renewal found in the salvation of the blood of Jesus Christ.   

Bethany Verrett

After feeding 5,000 men plus women and children, Jesus speaks to the crowd again, this time offering them a different kind of bread, one that would never rot, and would always keep them full. When the people ask for this bread, the Bible records, “Jesus said to them, ‘I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger and whoever believes in me shall never thirst” (John 6:35).

Figurative and literary language exists in many places in the Bible. From the poetry in the Psalms to the parables of Jesus, imagery and metaphor are a part of how God speaks to the world in His Word. It communicates heavenly concepts that are difficult to put into words, or is a way for the Holy Spirit to speak to the soul, and provides concrete images to help individuals grasp abstract, metaphysical, ideas.

The bread of life is not physical bread, but the bread of spiritual renewal found in the salvation of the blood of Jesus Christ.   

How is Jesus the Bread of Life?

One of the themes in the Book of John is who Jesus is, and not just what He did. The Apostle John opens his account with an explanation of Jesus’ deity. In chapter six, he focuses on one of Lord’s miracles, and its fallout. Because the Lord performed miracles of healing and taught the Scriptures with authority, there would sometimes be throngs following him.

In one of these instances, the Lord takes five loaves of bread and two fish and feeds thousands of people with it, with twelve baskets leftover. That night, He walks on water. The next day, those same thousands gather again to be fed. Jesus then offers them salvation – eternal nourishment – rather than just temporary sustenance. 

“Truly, truly, I say to you, you are seeking me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate your fill of the loaves. Do not work for the food that perishes, but for the food that endures to eternal life, which the Son of Man will give to you. For on him God the Father has set his seal… For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day” (John 6:26-27, 40).

The Lord presents His miracle as an opening act. In this life, mankind must toil and labor for food that only temporarily nourishes the body, which will eventually die. He had the power and authority to multiply that food and could do so much more.

If they put their faith in Him, then they would have eternal life. He reminds them about the manna the Father gave their ancestors in the wilderness after leaving Egypt. He then states, “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever. And the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh” (John 6:51).

The response to this offer for eternal life through the bread of life was not positive. The Bible recounts the people complaining, and even some of His disciples leaving, unable to understand the metaphor, or unwilling to accept Jesus’ explanation of who He is.

What Is the “Bread of Life”?

Bread is one of the essential foods of many cultures all around the world; it is a staple in many diets, and for centuries it would have been one of the most accessible foods for people of all wealth and social statuses.

At that point in history, especially in Jesus’ culture, bread would have been understood as a nutritional necessity. It also has historical significance for the Jewish people, harkening back to God’s life-sustaining manna, which kept their people alive in the desert. Jesus chose bread as His metaphor intentionally.

Salvation and a relationship with the Lord are not like a sweet treat – not necessary but enjoyable. It is not like meat, which one can survive without but is important to a well-rounded diet in many circumstances.

Salvation is essential to human existence and necessary for eternity. When Jesus says He is the bread of life, He is saying He is essential.

Just as God the Father provided nourishment, He was providing a path to redemption for mankind, separated from Him by sin, through Jesus Christ. The Lord underscores that He is the way to this redemption by foreshadowing the crucifixion. Without the crucifixion and the resurrection, the sins of the world remain unpaid, and mankind remains under the law.

As Paul would go on to explain, “For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit” (Romans 8:3-4).

In the context of the events of John 6, Jesus was telling the crowd to follow Him to the crucifixion and resurrection, to believe in the promised redemption.

Where Else Does Jesus Talk about Bread?

The relationship between bread and salvation appears in other parts of the Gospel as well. The Book of Matthew recounts Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness after He was baptized by John the Baptist. He fasted for 40 days, and Satan came to Him with three temptations.

The first one tried to target that physical hunger from the fast, challenging the Lord to turn stones to bread in order to satiate His hunger. Jesus resists temptation saying, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God’” (Matthew 4:4). As He would say to the crowds, earthly food may solve the temporary state of hunger, but does not solve the eternal problems of sin and spiritual darkness. The Word of God contains the answers to bigger questions. 

An extension of this metaphor would extend to sin. There is a difference between leavened and unleavened bread. The first has been made to rise with yeast while the second has not. After an encounter with the Pharisees and Sadducees – political and religious leaders in Hebrew culture – the Lord Jesus warns His disciples, “Watch and beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and the Sadducees” (Matthew 16:6).

Despite having heard Jesus speak of bread in metaphorical terms on previous occasions, the disciples thought He meant literal bread. Jesus corrects them, and they understand the leaven represents the false teachings of both groups. 

The culmination of this symbol of bread as the saving nature of Jesus comes at the Last Supper. “Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and after blessing it broke it and gave it to the disciples, and said, ‘Take, eat; this is my body’” (Matthew 26:26). Here, the Lord explicitly spells out the nature of His upcoming crucifixion and His role in restoring people to a right relationship with God for eternity.

The breaking of the Lord’s body and the spilling of His blood on the cross paid man’s debts for their sins, making eternal life in heaven available. The bread consumed at that Passover meal only staved off hunger for a few hours, but the relationship with Jesus Christ will sustain them forever.

Why Is This Important?

Jesus identified Himself as the bread of life, the living water, and the way. He did not present Himself a source of salvation but as the only way to salvation. Without Him, without the bread of life, there is no hope for salvation. By identifying Himself as the source of forgiveness, Jesus makes the path to repentance and a relationship with God, plain, simple, and available for everyone.

There are no additional sacrifices or works, “because if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved” (Romans 10:9). The bread of life will sustain the believer.

Bible Verses about Bread

Matthew 26:26

Now as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and after blessing it broke it and gave it to the disciples, and said, “Take, eat; this is my body.”

1 Corinthians 10:17

Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.

John 6:35

Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.

Matthew 6:11

Give us this day our daily bread,

Ecclesiastes 9:7

Go, eat your bread with joy, and drink your wine with a merry heart, for God has already approved what you do.

John 6:47-50

Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever believes has eternal life. I am the bread of life. Your fathers ate the manna in the wilderness, and they died. This is the bread that comes down from heaven, so that one may eat of it and not die.

Sources

Walvoord, John and Roy Zuck. The Bible Knowledge Commentary New Testament. United States of America: Victor Books, 1983.

Wiersbe, Warren. The Wiersbe Bible Commentary. Colorado Springs: David C. Cook, 2007.

Wilmington, H.L. Wilmington’s Guide to the Bible. Wheaton: Tyndale House Publishers, 1981.

Photo credit: ©Getty Images/Thomas Soellner

Bethany Verrett is a freelance writer and editor. She maintains a faith and lifestyle blog graceandgrowing.com, where she muses about the Lord, life, culture, and ministry.

‘I Am the Bread of Life’ Meaning and Scripture


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Jesus, The Bread of Life.

BevLinder / Getty Images

By Mary Fairchild

Updated October 27, 2020

Bread of Life is a title Jesus Christ used to describe himself in John 6:35: “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry again. Whoever believes in me will never be thirsty” (NLT). The phrase, “I am the bread of life,” is one of several “I Am” statements that Jesus spoke in the Gospel of John

‘I Am the Bread of Life’

• Throughout the Bible, bread is a symbolic representation of God’s life-sustaining provision.

• When Jesus told the hungry crowds that he was the Bread of Life, he was teaching his followers that He alone was their true source of spiritual life, both in this present world and in the everlasting life to come.

• The Bread of Life that Jesus represents never perishes, spoils, or runs out.  

‘I Am the Bread of Life’ Sermon – John 6:35

In John 6, Jesus fed a large crowd—far more than 5,000 people—with just five loaves of barley bread and two fish (John 6:1-15). This miracle astounded the people who declared that Jesus was a great prophet—the one they had been expecting. But when Jesus saw that the people wanted to force him to be their king, he quietly slipped away to be alone in the hills.

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The next day the crowds went in search of Jesus, not because they had understood his miracle, but because he had filled their appetites. The people were caught up in the day to day treadmill of getting their needs met and providing food for their hungry bellies. But Jesus was concerned with saving their souls. He told them, “Don’t be so concerned about perishable things like food. Spend your energy seeking the eternal life that the Son of Man can give you” (John 6:27, NLT).

Lesson: Believing in Jesus Christ as the source of our spiritual existence is how we gain eternal life (John 3:16). When we put our faith in him, he gives us spiritual bread that will not spoil and abundant life that will never end.

Jesus wanted the people to comprehend who he was: “The true bread of God is the one who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world” (John 6:33; NLT). Again, the crowd asked for a miraculous sign, like when Moses gave the people manna to eat in the wilderness.

The crowds still saw Jesus merely as someone who could meet their physical needs. So, Jesus responded with this powerful and profound truth: “I am the bread of life that came down from heaven” (John 6:41). Christ explained that anyone who came to him in saving faith would never be hungry or thirsty again. God would not reject them, for it was his will that all should come to faith in him (verses 37-40).

The listeners knew that Jesus, by claiming to come from heaven, was declaring that he was God. He was the real Bread of Heaven—the ever-present daily Manna—the lifegiving, eternal source of provision for today, tomorrow, and all eternity.

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The people wanted this bread, but when Jesus explained that he himself was the Bread, they became more and more offended. Their offense turned to revulsion when Jesus explained that he had come to give his flesh and blood—to sacrifice His life—so that the world could have eternal life (John 6:51).

He declared, “I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you cannot have eternal life within you” (John 6:53, NLT). The teaching was so difficult to understand that many of his disciples deserted him.

Only those whose spiritual hearts had been opened could comprehend that to eat Christ’s flesh and drink his blood meant to grasp by faith the significance of Jesus’ death on the cross.

Lesson: It is the death of Jesus Christ that takes away the curse of sin and rescues those who receive his forgiveness from spiritual death. Christ’s sacrifice on the cross enables us to receive eternal life. To all who believe in him and accept him as Savior, He is the Bread of Life.

Bread of Life in the Old Testament

The idea of bread as a symbol of God’s provision and life was a well-developed concept in the Old Testament. Early on, when God established the wilderness tabernacle for worship among the people of Israel, he gave instructions to build a table called “the table of the showbread.” Every Sabbath, the priests of the tabernacle (and later, in the temple) would arrange twelve loaves of bread called “the bread of the presence” on the table near God’s presence in the holy place (Leviticus 24:9; Numbers 4:7).

This presentation of the bread symbolized God’s eternal, covenant relationship with his people and his constant care and provision for the tribes of Israel, represented by the twelve loaves of bread. When Jesus preached his sermon about being the Bread of Life, discerning Jews in the crowd would have connected the dots to this long-practiced aspect of their worship.

Commentary on John 6:35, 41-51

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Robert Hoch

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The reading begins with one of the most well-known “I am” sayings from the Gospel of John: “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty” (verse 35).

The narrator adds “to see” alongside the verb “to believe.” The Johannine Jesus drives home the significance of what it means to come to Jesus and believe using a chiasm around seeing and believing:

A (verse 36) seeing and not believing

B (verse 37) Jesus will not drive away those who come to him

C (verse 38) I have come down from heaven

B’ (verse 39) Jesus will lose nothing of all that God gives him

A’ (verse 40) seeing and believing.1

In sum, it is not enough to see glancingly (for example, verses 19, 25, 34, 42, and 52). Seeing Jesus rightly leads to believing in Jesus deeply.

For the first time in John 6, the narrator singles out “the Jews” as being the source of conflict for Jesus (verse 41). John is of course in the middle of a conflict and we can understand how conflicts lead to distortions, but we don’t need to bless them. In terms of clearing the sightlines for communication, it seems best to translate the narrator’s “the Jews” as “the religious authorities” or “religious leadership.”

Jesus’ words in verse 35 spark controversy among the religious leaders: “They were saying, ‘Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know?’” (John 6:42). Jesus doesn’t address the complaint as such but instead begins with God’s action (verses 44-46): God sends, draws, raises, and teaches. In turn, Jesus’ coming and being sent by God the Father gives rise to healthy verbs of receptivity: seeing, believing, hearing, and learning.2

It is not unusual to experience John as almost unbearably repetitive. Maybe the present chapter is especially heavy on repetition. Even so, it is not fair to say that John is just a repetition of Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus. Gail R. O’Day calls our attention to how recurring themes contribute to the cohesiveness of John’s theological perspective. When Jesus repeats the crowd’s exegesis of “our ancestors” in verse 31, it becomes “your ancestors” in verse 48, thus putting distance between Jesus and the crowd. Then Jesus takes the bread image one step further—before, in verse 35, those who came to Jesus would be satisfied; now, in verse 51, those who eat the living bread, Jesus, will live forever. The language that had been metaphorical shifts: “the bread that I will give for the life of the world is my flesh.”3

But why go after theological cohesiveness in this peculiar way? Is there something in the medium of John that can help us grasp its message?

Mulling this over, perhaps we notice the contrast between those who show a “glancing” acquaintance with Jesus and the narrator’s insistence that we see Jesus repeatedly. See Jesus as the One sent, and as the One to whom people come, and from whom people learn, and by whom people will be raised on the last day. See Jesus who sees and knows the Father. See Jesus who gives his flesh for the life of the world.

Living in John’s world as a disciple feels like enchantment, or perhaps being held in the steady gaze of the Word. But stand for a minute in the shoes of those who shake their heads in disbelief. Is the complaint of verses 41-42 anything worse than the way we might “glancingly” evaluate a loaf of bread? It is good or bad or neutral … but from heaven? Really?

“Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? How can he now say, ‘I have come down from heaven’?” (verse 42).

Imagine, for a moment, the agitated atmosphere of Jesus’ day, when hungry eyes searched for the one who would glow in the dark of this age. Consider the promiscuous gaze, always looking elsewhere, until, at last, it cannot look away. Or, in not looking away, decides to linger in the gaze of the one who lingers with us.

The “I am” sayings hold our gaze on a person who seems and is very human, maybe the first real human being. Maybe we wonder what it means to believe in Jesus whom we have not seen. It seems to be a problem. And yet, even if we do not “see” Jesus, we do “see” the symbols of the “I am” sayings: “I am the bread of life” (verse 35); “I am the living bread that came down from heaven” (verse 51); “I am the gate for the sheep” (John 10:7, 9); “I am the good shepherd” (John 10:11, 14). The sayings point to commonplace images: shepherd, bread, vines, a viticulturist, a gate, and a gatekeeper.

But is there anything really “common” about the human experience? Or, what’s there to see that we haven’t already seen?

Reflection

When we left the U.S. for England, we weren’t able to take much with us. For complicated reasons, our family pictures ended up with my parents in California, some 5,000 miles away. However, as we were packing, we did take along some pieces of art made by family members, especially our children. We also packed some of the sketches my mom has sent us over the years. We’ve framed them, and they are now hanging in our living room. Each picture consists of a few quick brushstrokes. The pictures include animals that you see in nature: a hummingbird, a school of salmon, a dragonfly, a wading bird, a deer.

It was only a few days ago when it dawned on me that we don’t have any pictures of my mom. We’ve been living here for five months at the time of my writing. Why hadn’t I missed her picture? As I looked again at those sketches, I knew the answer: when I see those paintings, I see them, but I “see” my mom. Or perhaps I see through my mom’s eyes, and I “see” her, almost as if she were here, in this place.

CHAPTER 6

Jesus feeds the five thousand—He walks on the sea—He is the living manna sent from God—Salvation is gained by eating living bread—Jesus explains how men eat His flesh and drink His blood—Peter testifies that Jesus is the Messiah.

1 After these things Jesus went over the sea of Galilee, which is the sea of Tiberias.

2 And a great multitude followed him, because they saw his miracles which he did on them that were diseased.

3 And Jesus went up into a mountain, and there he sat with his disciples.

4 And the apassover, a feast of the Jews, was nigh.

5 ¶ When Jesus then lifted up his eyes, and saw a great company come unto him, he saith unto Philip, Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?

6 And this he said to prove him: for he himself knew what he would do.

7 Philip answered him, Two hundred pennyworth of bread is not sufficient for them, that every one of them may take a little.

8 One of his disciples, Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, saith unto him,

9 There is a lad here, which hath five barley loaves, and two small fishes: but what are they among so many?

10 And Jesus said, Make the men sit down. Now there was much grass in the place. So the men sat down, in number about afive thousand.

11 And Jesus took the loaves; and when he had given athanks, he distributed to the disciples, and the disciples to them that were set down; and likewise of the fishes as much as they would.

12 When they were filled, he said unto his disciples, Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be alost.

13 Therefore they gathered them together, and filled twelve baskets with the fragments of the five barley loaves, which remained over and above unto them that had eaten.

14 Then those men, when they had seen the amiracle that Jesus did, said, This is of a truth that bprophet that should come into the world.

15 ¶ When Jesus therefore perceived that they would come and take him by force, to make him a aking, he departed again into a mountain himself alone.

16 And when even was now come, his disciples went down unto the sea,

17 And entered into a ship, and went over the sea toward Capernaum. And it was now dark, and Jesus was not come to them.

18 And the sea arose by reason of a great wind that blew.

19 So when they had rowed about five and twenty or thirty furlongs, they see Jesus walking on the sea, and drawing nigh unto the ship: and they were aafraid.

20 But he saith unto them, It is I; be not afraid.

21 Then they willingly received him into the ship: and immediately the ship was at the land whither they went.

22 ¶ The day following, when the people which stood on the other side of the sea saw that there was none other boat there, save that one whereinto his disciples were entered, and that Jesus went not with his disciples into the boat, but that his disciples were gone away alone;

23 (Howbeit there came other boats from Tiberias nigh unto the place where they did eat bread, after that the Lord had given thanks:)

24 When the people therefore saw that Jesus was not there, neither his disciples, they also took shipping, and came to Capernaum, seeking for Jesus.

25 And when they had found him on the other side of the sea, they said unto him, Rabbi, when camest thou hither?

26 Jesus answered them and said, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Ye seek me, anot because ye saw the miracles, but because ye did eat of the loaves, and were filled.

27 aLabour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the bSon of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father csealed.

28 Then said they unto him, What shall we do, that we might work the works of God?

29 Jesus answered and said unto them, This is the work of God, that ye abelieve on him whom he hath sent.

30 They said therefore unto him, What asign shewest thou then, that we may see, and believe thee? what dost thou work?

31 Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave them abread from heaven to eat.

32 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven.

33 For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world.

34 Then said they unto him, Lord, evermore give us this bread.

35 And Jesus said unto them, I am the abread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never bthirst.

36 But I said unto you, That ye also have seen me, and believe not.

37 All that the Father agiveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise bcast out.

38 For I acame down from heaven, not to do mine own bwill, but the cwill of him that sent me.

39 And this is the aFather’s bwill which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose cnothing, but should draise it up again at the last day.

40 And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and abelieveth on him, may have beverlasting life: and I will raise him up cat the last day.

41 The Jews then murmured at him, because he said, I am the bread which came down from heaven.

42 And they said, Is not this Jesus, the son of aJoseph, whose father and mother we know? how is it then that he saith, I came down from heaven?

43 Jesus therefore answered and said unto them, aMurmur not among yourselves.

44 aNo man can bcome to me, except the Father which hath sent me cdraw him: and I will raise him up at the last day.

45 It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all ataught of God. Every man therefore that hath heard, and hath learned of the bFather, cometh unto me.

46 Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath aseen the Father.

47 Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that abelieveth on me hath beverlasting life.

48 I am that bread of life.

49 Your fathers did eat amanna in the wilderness, and are dead.

50 This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.

51 I am the living abread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bbread that I will give is my cflesh, which I will dgive for the elife of the world.

52 The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us his flesh to eat?

53 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye aeat the flesh of the bSon of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you.

54 Whoso eateth my aflesh, and drinketh my bblood, hath eternal life; cand I will draise him up at the last day.

55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

56 He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, adwelleth in me, and I in him.

57 As the living Father hath asent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall blive by me.

58 This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.

59 These things said he in the synagogue, as he taught in Capernaum.

60 Many therefore of his disciples, when they had heard this, said, This is an hard saying; who can hear it?

61 When Jesus aknew in himself that his disciples murmured at it, he said unto them, Doth this boffend you?

62 What and if ye shall see the aSon of man bascend up where he was before?

63 It is the aspirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.

64 But there are some of you that believe not. For Jesus knew from the beginning who they were that believed not, and who should abetray him.

65 And he said, Therefore said I unto you, that no man can come unto me, aexcept it were given unto him of my Father.

66 ¶ From that time many of his adisciples went back, and bwalked no more with him.

67 Then said Jesus unto the twelve, Will ye also go away?

68 Then Simon Peter answered him, Lord, to whom shall we go? thou hast the awords of eternal life.

69 And awe believe and are sure that thou art that Christ, the bSon of the living God.

70 Jesus answered them, Have not I achosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil?

71 He spake of Judas Iscariot the son of Simon: for he it was that should betray him, being one of the twelve.

What Does John 6:35 Mean? ►

Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst.

John 6:35(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

During his earthly ministry, Christ taught the multitudes that He was the promised Messiah. He authenticated His claims through many signs and wonders, such as the feeding of the 5000. The supply of bread and fish satisfied the crowd’s physical hunger and excited their carnal cravings, but they neglected to understand the deeper meaning of this miracle of Jesus.

Knowing that the Lord had crossed to the other side of the Galilee caused the people to pursue after Him, in the hopes that they would get more free food! But Jesus knew that they were following Him for the wrong reason. They were not seeking Him because they understood the sign, but because they ate of the loaves and were filled. They were not following Him because their soul was hungry for forgiveness, but to satisfy their physical appetite.

Jesus warned them not to work for the bodily food which perishes, but for the food which endures to eternal life… which He alone could give them… He was the One on Whom the Father set His seal. It was not being fed on bread and fish that these lost souls needed, but feeding on the Bread of Life from heaven – feeding on Christ, the Son of Man, in Whom is life eternal. 

It must have saddened His heart when Jesus saw their proud, unbelieving attitude, especially when they asked Him to show them a sign that He was the Messiah as He claimed. They argued that their forefathers had eaten heavenly manna for 40 years, so by comparison Jesus had only done one paltry little miracle with earthly food, not daily manna from heaven!

They wanted Jesus to carry out a similar spectacle to Moses, as proof of His Messianic claims.”Give us this bread from heaven,” they demanded. “Give us that manna from above.” They clamoured for physical food but refused to acknowledge the astonishing truth He revealed to them. “I Am the Bread of Life,” He said. “I am the Bread that you are seeking. He who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst.” Jesus offered Himself to the people of Israel, but they turned Him down.

Jesus announced the most earth-shattering truth to these people and they misunderstood, through unbelief. He did not say he HAD the bread of life but He WAS the Bread of Life. In Him was eternal life and the one who comes to Him will never hunger nor thirst. Christ could satisfy their spiritual hunger and spiritual thirst because He is the Living Water and the Bread of Life from heaven… and these people missed it.

This was the first of seven claims Jesus made about being the Bread of Life from heaven. He told them that He is not only the Giver but the Sustainer of our lives. He becomes our living nourishment, day by day, strengthening and sustaining us, in and through His everlasting, life-giving power. Not only does Christ give us each day our daily bread, but He also imparts to us His life-giving Spirit, which is life everlasting.

This was the first of seven titles that Christ used about Himself that started with the sentence, “I AM..” I AM the Bread of Life which will satisfy and sustain you through time and into eternity. I AM the Light of the World to dispel the darkness of sin and death. I AM the Gate – the Entrance Door into security and means of fellowship with almighty God. I AM the Good Shepherd, to lead and guide, to feed and protect.

The Lord Jesus is the Resurrection and the Life. He is the Way, the Truth, and the Life, and He is the True Vine without Whom we can do nothing. Jesus is the centre and circumference of life. He is the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the End, the Genesis and Revelation, the Source and Conclusion, and the Author and Finisher of our faith.

All are invited to feast at the banqueting table… to feed on Christ our Living Bread, Who came down from heaven from the Father of mercies. And all who feast upon the Lord are promised the eternal benefits of this life-sustaining heavenly Manna – that true Bread Who satisfies the hungry heart with all good things.

Every word uttered by our dear Lord Jesus is spirit and life to all who come to Him as Saviour. All those who feed on Christ will live forever, for Jesus said to those who followed Him, “truly I tell you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you.”

May we daily feed on the Bread of Life, by faith with thanksgiving as we journey through life, for He alone is our life-sustain er for in Him are the words of eternal life.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/john-6-35

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/john-6-35

What does John 6:35 mean?

This verse AM” statement of John’s gospel. In each of these instances, Jesus uses the phrase “I AM” in reference to Himself, providing perspective on His mission and His ministry. This is the same reference used by God Himself when speaking to Moses from the burning bush in Exodus 3:13–14. It is the phrasing Jesus will use, to the same disciple writing this gospel, in Revelation 1:8.

The people have come to Jesus looking for another miracle, and for more free food (John 6:26). Instead, Jesus says they need to be seeking the “true bread from heaven” in order to obtain eternal life. Jesus has already clarified that this does not mean good works, but refers to belief in the One sent by God.

Here, Jesus explicitly declares that He, Himself, is the One sent by God. Eternal life is found only through belief in Jesus Christ (John 14:6; John 3:36; Acts 4:12). Jesus continues the analogy of food here, combining the ideas of spiritual hunger (Matthew 4:4) and spiritual thirst (John 4:13–14). Here, saving faith is seen as an analogy to food and drink: a person must take it inside of themselves—acceptance is a requirement for these blessings to have any effect!

Context Summary

John 6:22–40 describes the initial aftermath of Jesus’ feeding of thousands the previous day. The crowd’s actual desire is for another supernatural spectacle and more free food. In this passage, Christ begins to explain the true meaning behind His miracle and His ministry. This includes the first of seven ”I AM” statements in the gospel of John—moments where Jesus declares His own divinity. Jesus clarifies that physical things such as bread are meant to be symbols of a spiritual truth. In the following segment, the crowd will stop seeking and start complaining.

Chapter Context

In chapter 6, Jesus feeds thousands of people who had been following Him. He does this by miraculously dividing the contents of a small lunch, leaving more left over than He had to begin with. At first, the crowd is amazed and they enthusiastically praise Jesus. After sending the disciples across the Sea of Galilee, and rescuing them from a storm by walking on the water, Jesus once again addresses the crowd. This time, He emphasizes the spiritual lesson behind His prior miracle. In response, most of those who had been praising Jesus turn away from Him in disappointment

Christ‘s Message In Your Heart

VERSE OF THE DAY

Colossians 3:16 (Good News Translation)

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Christ’s message in all its richness must live in your hearts. Teach and instruct one another with all wisdom. Sing psalms, hymns, and sacred songs; sing to God with thanksgiving in your hearts.

Christ’s teaching and message is within you and your living within your heart. Mentor and teach each other with all wisdom and honor. Sing and rejoice honoring God with thanksgiving in you heart and soul.

COLOSSIANS 3:15

January 28, 2021

And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body. And be thankful.

Devotional Thoughts

By David Wilkerson

At the cross, mercy and peace took on the face of Jesus Christ. Throughout history, whenever a child of God has fully trusted in the cleansing, healing power of Christ’s blood, peace has been promised. It is Christ’s own peace, the very peace that rules paradise.

The apostle Paul’s words on this subject are meant to help every believer apply this truth in his own walk:

“Let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also you were called in one body; and be thankful” (Colossians 3:15, my italics).

Dear saint, this is our hope in all our battles: Let peace rule your heart by resting in the promises of God. “Now may the Lord of peace Himself give you peace always in every way. The Lord be with you all” (2 Thessalonians 3:16).

May the following prayer of Paul become ours, as well, in these days of uncertainty:

“The God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit” (Romans 15:13).

Thank God for His joy and peace!

What Does Colossians 3:15 Mean? ►

Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body; and be thankful.

Colossians 3:15(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

Peace WITH God is our permanent possession when we believe on the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation, but the peace OF God is conditional upon a believer being in a relationship with the Lord Jesus – as we abide in Christ, trust His Word, depend on His guidance, die to self and live for Him.

Isaiah explained to Israel: Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee: because he trusts in Thee. Paul teaches the Philippian Christians that IF they are anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication make their requests known to God with a thankful heart – THEN the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard their hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

Peace WITH God is never removed from the man or woman who has trusted in the death, burial and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ.. but once we are saved by grace through faith.. the inner perfect peace OF God which rules our hearts and minds is dependent on us maintaining a right relationship with God. This is achieved through humble praise, reverent prayer, grateful thanks and a submissive heart that has faith in God’s Word and trusts that God will keep His word – in all things.

Peace WITH God is the eternal birthright and unchangeable privilege of all true believers but the peace OF God depends on the choices a Christian make in the ups and downs of our everyday lives. God’s peace within becomes a wonderful internal barometer of our closeness to our heavenly Father and our abiding in Christ.

Yes, the promised peace of Christ is an accurate indicator of ones standing with the Lord and is a guide as to whether or not we are abiding in Christ and resting in His love. The spiritual man or woman who is walking in spirit and truth will know a peace in their heart which passes understanding.. even in the midst of great trials and difficulties.. while the one who is out of fellowship and walking in fleshly carnality will have inner turmoil of spirit and disease of the soul.

It is a daily and often moment by moment choice to permit the peace of Christ to rule in our heart. He promised us His peace and it is already ours.. and as long as we steadily look to Him and away from ourselves, His peace becomes an abiding reality. His inner peace is something to which all believers are called, both individually and corporately and should become a reality in the lives of all who are called by His name.. for each is given particular gifts and a unique ministry that is designed to give mutual encouragement to one another in our service to the Lord.

But the peace of God can too often be hindered when a heart is devoid of thanksgiving and praise. A grateful heart that is filled with heavenly thanks and praise to God, is a heart that is ready and prepared to have the peace of Christ stream into their inner being and flow out to others – as a testimony of praise to our heavenly Father.

May we with one accord let the peace of Christ rule in our hearts day by day and moment by moment.. for it is to this that the body in Christ has been called – and let us in all things be thankful.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/colossians-3-15

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/colossians-3-15

What does Colossians 3:16 mean? [ See verse text ]

In verses 12 through 15, Paul describes ten positive behaviors which Christians are supposed to practice. This important verse offers an eleventh trait: letting the “word of Christ dwell in you richly.” The “word of Christ” refers to Christ’s teachings, both directly as found in the Gospels as well as those explained by the apostles. According to Paul, the teachings of Jesus “live” within believers in a powerful way.

This verse lists three specific applications of Christ’s word dwelling in the life of a believer. The first two aspects are noted together: teaching and admonition. Christ’s word can instruct us, which is “teaching.” At the same time, Christ’s word can also show us where we are wrong. The word of Christ gives us guidance in how to correct mistakes in what we believe and what we do.

Third, Paul encourages the singing of various types of spiritual songs. Paul never gives preference to one type of music over another. His purpose here is simply to state that all types of music were to be used to let the word of Christ dwell richly within us. This singing was to be done with an attitude of thanksgiving. Singing praise to God is largely associated with showing our gratitude to Him, rather than focusing on ourselves or our own desires.

Context Summary

Colossians 3:12–17 follows Paul’s advice on sins to avoid by listing positive traits Christians should strive to emulate. Among these are compassion, humility, patience, and forgiveness. More important than any other is love, which not only inspires the other traits, but which binds Christians together as a single family, under Christ. Paul then opens the idea of following Christ to include every aspect of our lives: whatever we think or do, as believers, ought to be compatible with the example of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Chapter Summary

In this chapter, Paul gives clear instructions to Christians about living out faith in Christ. Since believers have been saved by Christ, they should not participate in the sins which trap unbelievers. Sexual immorality, jealousy, slander, and revenge are not to be part of the Christian’s life. Instead, believers ought to demonstrate compassion, humility, patience, and forgiveness. Above all, followers of Christ should show love. Paul also gives specific instructions for those living in Christian homes, including husbands, wives, children, and servants

Let the Word Dwell Richly — Colossians 3:16–17

Aaron Shipp

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Aug 6, 2017 · 3 min read

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God. (Colossians 3:16)

Let the Word of Christ dwell in you richly. I looked at six different translations and every one of them made use of the word dwell. Dwell means “to live in” or “to be at home.” We must allow the Word of God to live in us and have a home in our hearts and minds.

John MacArthur connects this verse with Ephesians 5:18 “Do not get drunk with wine, which will only ruin you; instead, be filled with the Spirit.” As you continue on in both Colossians 3 and Ephesians 5, we are shown that letting the Word (Col 3) and Spirit (Eph 5) dwell in our lives have the same results, which led MacArthur to say that “the two are the same spiritual reality viewed from two sides.”

We are told to teach and admonish. What does that mean? We are to teach others the Word of God through message and song. To admonish someone is to warn or reprimand them. We must warn people of what is to come if they do not accept Christ and his teachings. Both teaching and admonishing must come from the wisdom we gain by allowing the Word of God to dwell within us.

What of Worship?

Warren W. Wiersbe talks briefly on the subject of worship in his commentary of the book of Colossians 3:16.

There is (according to Paul) a definite relationship between our knowledge of the Bible and our expression of worship in song. One way we teach and encourage ourselves and others is through the singing of the Word of God. But if we do not know the Bible and understand it, we cannot honestly sing it from our hearts.”

Singing praise to God is not just for others to hear. If we sing from our lips but not our hearts then we are not really worshiping God.

“As a believer grows in his knowledge of the Word, he will want to grow in his expression of praise.” The Hymns and Psalms are an important part of any church that wants to worship the Lord in song. At the same time the gospel and spiritual songs are important as well. We are commanded to sing spiritual songs just as we are commanded to sing psalms and hymns. While they convey different things as long as they are from the Word of God they should be used as praise to Christ.

Wiersbe said “A singer has no more right to sing a lie than a preacher has to preach a lie.” Worship in song is an important part of a believer’s life in Christ. If we as leaders are not familiar with the Word of God that our music should be based on than how can we “lead” others in praise to him? Without the knowledge of the word in our minds and hearts we can not truly And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. (Colossians 3:17)

It is difficult to discuss verse sixteen without also looking at seventeen. Whatever we do we must do it in the name of the Lord Christ Jesus. When we sing Psalms we must do it in the name of Christ. When we sing Hymns we must do it in the name of Christ. When we read and study the word we must do it in the name of Christ. When we go to work we must do it in the name of Christ. Every aspect of our life must be done to give thanks to God for what he has done and will do for us in our lives.

Live The Peace Of Christ

VERSE OF THE DAY

Colossians 3:15 (New Living Translation)

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And let the peace that comes from Christ rule in your hearts. For as members of one body you are called to live in peace. And always be thankful.

Let yourself be calm and relaxed I’m perfect personal peace and calmness knowing you live a godly life that by Christ you have been refreshed to live in one body as a temple of God being at peace and thanksgiving

COLOSSIANS 3:15

January 28, 2021

And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body. And be thankful.

Devotional Thoughts

By David Wilkerson

At the cross, mercy and peace took on the face of Jesus Christ. Throughout history, whenever a child of God has fully trusted in the cleansing, healing power of Christ’s blood, peace has been promised. It is Christ’s own peace, the very peace that rules paradise.

The apostle Paul’s words on this subject are meant to help every believer apply this truth in his own walk:

“Let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also you were called in one body; and be thankful” (Colossians 3:15, my italics).

Dear saint, this is our hope in all our battles: Let peace rule your heart by resting in the promises of God. “Now may the Lord of peace Himself give you peace always in every way. The Lord be with you all” (2 Thessalonians 3:16).

May the following prayer of Paul become ours, as well, in these days of uncertainty:

“The God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit” (Romans 15:13).

Thank God for His joy and peace!

What Does Colossians 3:15 Mean? ►

Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body; and be thankful.

Colossians 3:15(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

Peace WITH God is our permanent possession when we believe on the Lord Jesus Christ for salvation, but the peace OF God is conditional upon a believer being in a relationship with the Lord Jesus – as we abide in Christ, trust His Word, depend on His guidance, die to self and live for Him.

Isaiah explained to Israel: Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on Thee: because he trusts in Thee. Paul teaches the Philippian Christians that IF they are anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication make their requests known to God with a thankful heart – THEN the peace of God, which surpasses all comprehension, will guard their hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

Peace WITH God is never removed from the man or woman who has trusted in the death, burial and resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ.. but once we are saved by grace through faith.. the inner perfect peace OF God which rules our hearts and minds is dependent on us maintaining a right relationship with God. This is achieved through humble praise, reverent prayer, grateful thanks and a submissive heart that has faith in God’s Word and trusts that God will keep His word – in all things.

Peace WITH God is the eternal birthright and unchangeable privilege of all true believers but the peace OF God depends on the choices a Christian make in the ups and downs of our everyday lives. God’s peace within becomes a wonderful internal barometer of our closeness to our heavenly Father and our abiding in Christ.

Yes, the promised peace of Christ is an accurate indicator of ones standing with the Lord and is a guide as to whether or not we are abiding in Christ and resting in His love. The spiritual man or woman who is walking in spirit and truth will know a peace in their heart which passes understanding.. even in the midst of great trials and difficulties.. while the one who is out of fellowship and walking in fleshly carnality will have inner turmoil of spirit and disease of the soul.

It is a daily and often moment by moment choice to permit the peace of Christ to rule in our heart. He promised us His peace and it is already ours.. and as long as we steadily look to Him and away from ourselves, His peace becomes an abiding reality. His inner peace is something to which all believers are called, both individually and corporately and should become a reality in the lives of all who are called by His name.. for each is given particular gifts and a unique ministry that is designed to give mutual encouragement to one another in our service to the Lord.

But the peace of God can too often be hindered when a heart is devoid of thanksgiving and praise. A grateful heart that is filled with heavenly thanks and praise to God, is a heart that is ready and prepared to have the peace of Christ stream into their inner being and flow out to others – as a testimony of praise to our heavenly Father.

May we with one accord let the peace of Christ rule in our hearts day by day and moment by moment.. for it is to this that the body in Christ has been called – and let us in all things be thankful.

My Prayer

Heavenly Father, I pray that the peace of God may rule in my heart with thanksgiving and praise, and if there is anything in my life that is preventing Your peace from guarding my heart today, I pray that You would show me. May I honour You in all I say and do and I pray that I may grow more like the Lord Jesus in my dealings with my brothers and sisters in Christ, so that Your peace may guard my heart and the peace of Christ may flow through me to others – This I ask in Jesus name, AMEN.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/colossians-3-15&nbsp;

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/colossians-3-15

What does Colossians 3:15 mean? [ See verse text ]

In verses 12 through 14, Paul has given eight positive traits which Christians are to emulate. Here, he adds two additional ideals for believers to pursue.

First, he calls believers to live in peace. Peace, part of the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22–23), is noted in this letter as coming from God our Father (Colossians 1:2). We receive peace with God through the blood of the cross (Colossians 1:20). It is to “rule” in our hearts, meaning it should be in charge of how we live. Believers are not called to live in violence or squabbles among each other, but in peace.

It’s important to remember the context of this statement. Paul is not referring to peace in the sense of “happy feelings.” In prior verses, he was discussing the need for Christians to tolerate, love, and support each other. In this verse, after mentioning peace, Paul again speaks of the unity Christians have. With Christ as the head, we are all part of a spiritual “body,” which is the church. Peace within the body requires peace between its parts. Every group of believers will experience internal conflict at times, but seeking peace will help us resolve issues in the context of Christian love.

The second trait Paul mentions in this verse is simple: an attitude of thanksgiving. Paul mentions thanks multiple times in this letter, showing the importance of gratitude in the Christian life (Colossians 1:3; 2:7; 3:16–17; 4:2).

Context Summary

Colossians 3:12–17 follows Paul’s advice on sins to avoid by listing positive traits Christians should strive to emulate. Among these are compassion, humility, patience, and forgiveness. More important than any other is love, which not only inspires the other traits, but which binds Christians together as a single family, under Christ. Paul then opens the idea of following Christ to include every aspect of our lives: whatever we think or do, as believers, ought to be compatible with the example of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Chapter Summary

In this chapter, Paul gives clear instructions to Christians about living out faith in Christ. Since believers have been saved by Christ, they should not participate in the sins which trap unbelievers. Sexual immorality, jealousy, slander, and revenge are not to be part of the Christian’s life. Instead, believers ought to demonstrate compassion, humility, patience, and forgiveness. Above all, followers of Christ should show love. Paul also gives specific instructions for those living in Christian homes, including husbands, wives, children, and servants

I Always Thank God For You

1 Corinthians 1:4-5 (New Living Translation)

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I always thank my God for you and for the gracious gifts he has given you, now that you belong to Christ Jesus. Through him, God has enriched your church in every way—with all of your eloquent words and all of your knowledge.

when we say that we are praying for you what that means is yes we are praying for you! Come pray with us! We are familiar and greatly appreciate you and your gifts God has given you now that you belong to Christ Jesus. Through him, God has enriched your church in every way—with all of your eloquent words and all of your knowledge.

1 Corinthians 1:4

“I thank my God always on your behalf, for the grace of God which is given you by Jesus Christ;”

King James Version (KJV)

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…

The apostle Paul was amazing. He is writing one of the most problematic churches and yet finds reasons to give thanks for them. First, he is thankful for them because Jesus died for them. When God extends his grace to others, how can we not do the same? Second, he recognizes the areas of their abuse are also a reason to give thanks — they may have distorted it, but when reigned in to honor God, these gifts could bless their church. Even though he has tough words to follow, Paul’s example reminds us that a child of God is something to be cherished, even if that child has problems.

My Prayer…

Gracious Father, give me the heart to see reasons to be thankful for all of your children. I confess that it is often so easy for me to view others based on how they view me, share my theological opinions, or how much trouble they cause me. Forgive me, for I know if you had done the same with me, I would have never been one of your children. Please help me rejoice in your children. In Jesus’ name I pray. Amen.

What does 1 Corinthians 1:4 mean?

Paul begins his letter to this troubled church with some remarkably positive words for them. These are also encouraging for all of us who are Christians. This opening is even more striking because of the bold words of correction Paul will use later. He is writing to respond to wrong behaviors and attitudes he has heard about among them. At the same time, he seeks to answer their questions about how to live as believers in a godless culture.

Paul starts, though, by declaring that his first thought when the believers of Corinth come to mind is to thank God for them. He does this “always,” meaning regularly and continually. He expresses that he is truly grateful to God for these people he spent so much time with. Next Paul describes why he is so grateful for them. First, he gives thanks because they have been given grace from God in Christ Jesus. In other words, God has already welcomed them into His family and given them a place with Him in eternity because they came to Him through faith in Christ.

Neither we nor the Corinthians deserve that enormous gift. We have earned quite the opposite with our sin and, in many ways, we continue to fail to live up to the good God has given to us. Paul is so glad for the grace they have received, even as they continue to fail to do what is right in some important ways.

Context Summary

First Corinthians 1:4–9 is about God’s grace to the Corinthians. Before beginning to address problems in the church, Paul first declares his thanks to God for the people. Specifically, he is thankful for God’s grace and the good gifts God has given to them. Those gifts confirm that the Corinthians are truly in Christ. This means Christ will sustain them all the way to the end. Because they are in Christ who has paid for their sin with His blood, they will stand blameless before God on the day of the Lord.

Chapter Summary

Paul’s letter to the Christians in Corinth begins with thanks for the great and powerful gifts God has given to them by His grace and through their faith in Christ. They will stand blameless before God in the end. Right now, though, they must stop dividing themselves according to which Christian teacher they follow and become unified in and around Christ. The gospel message of Christ’s death on the cross is weak and foolish to the world, but God has given faith in Christ to those who believe it and find God’s power and wisdom

What Does 1 Corinthians 1:2 Mean? ►

To the church of God which is at Corinth, to those who have been sanctified in Christ Jesus, saints by calling, with all who in every place call on the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, their Lord and ours:

1 Corinthians 1:2(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

This verse was not only a blessing to the believers at Corinth but to all Christians, but to all who have been saved by grace through faith. This truth is a blessing to all who have been born from above – to all who are part of the Church of God, for this verse reminds us that ALL Christian are sanctified in Christ. All are saints of God and set apart unto Him, for we are all united with Christ, and all are positionally set apart in Him.

Oh, we are certainly being sanctified in this life as we grow in grace and mature in the faith, through the empowerment of the Holy Spirit, but even this group, whom we discover to be the most carnal Christians in the new Testament, have been sanctified in Christ Jesus and set apart unto God.

When we recognise what amazing grace the Lord is showing to this group of unspiritual Christian who were engaging in such ungodly pursuits and divisive arguments, it should cause us to humble ourselves before our long-suffering Father, Who demonstrates equal grace and patience towards every one of His children.

Should we not seek day by day to willingly submit to the guidance of the Holy Spirit in our life and seek to live godly in Christ Jesus, as we grow in grace?

Should we not humble ourselves under the mighty hand of God and cry out for Him to search our hearts and test our thoughts and identify any offensive behaviour in our lives, knowing that by His grace He has set us all apart for His good purpose, so that in His strength we may complete the good work that He foreordained that we should walk in?

My Prayer

Heavenly Father, search me I pray and identify any area in my life that is not pleasing to You and may I live godly in Christ Jesus and in submissive obedience to Your Holy Spirit. I pray that I may fulfil all that You would have me to do in my life, to Your praise and glory, this I ask in Jesus name, AMEN

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/1-corinthians-1-2

What Does 1 Corinthians 1:5 Mean? ►

that in every way you were enriched in him in all speech and all knowledge–

1 Corinthians 1:5(ESV)

Verse Thoughts

The little words every and all seem so insignificant and yet what a tremendous reach they have in our lives and what joy should fill our hearts knowing that in EVERY way we are enriched in Jesus, not only in a few or some or many ways – but in every way. And we are not only enriched in every way but as if to garner our attention we are reminded that Christ’s enrichment covers ALL speech and ALL knowledge! We are not only enriched in every way in Christ, but His super-abundant enrichment and favour includes all utterance and all knowledge.

The indwelling holy Spirit has been sent to enrich us by guiding us into all truth relative to sound doctrine; salvation; sanctification; glorification and all that streams from the amazing grace of God. And it is the same holy Spirit that opens our understanding to the magnificent character of God that is beyond understanding and yet is being opened up to us more and more, as we seek to know Him better.

No wonder Paul could rejoice that in every way we are enriched in Him in all speech and understanding – which is being continuously showered upon us all in great profusion and which stands as a testimony that Christ is confirmed in us.

Every child of God that has been born from above and placed into the body of Christ by the Spirit is equally enriched and knowing the superabundant riches of God’s gracious enrichment should we not walk in utter devotion to the God – who has so blessed us? Should not we, who have been rescued from the jaws of sin and death – live and walk in a way that is pleasing and acceptable to our holy God.

Should not we, who have been accepted in the beloved and been made children of God – walk in the spirit of unity, one with the other and show forth His grace within us to others?

Should not we who have been enriched in every way in Him, in all utterance and knowledge – show forth the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God and the fellowship of the holy Spirit in our lives from this day forward and henceforth for every more? 

My Prayer

Loving Father, thank You for enriching me is all possible ways ways in Christ Jesus my Lord. I pray that I may live in a way pleasing to You in all speech and activity, so that Your name is glorified in my life, in Jesus name I pray, AMEN.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/1-corinthians-1-5

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/1-corinthians-1-5

Make Them Holy By Your Truth

VERSE OF THE DAY

John 17:17 (New Living Translation)

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Make them holy by your truth; teach them your word, which is truth.

May They be sanctified I’m your truth found in you in your truth in your word

I am not praying for the world, but for those you have given me, for they are yours. All I have is yours, and all you have is mine. And glory has come to me through them. I will remain in the world no longer, but they are still in the world, and I am coming to you.

John 17 is the seventeenth chapter of the Gospel of John in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It portrays a prayer of Jesus Christ addressed to His Father, placed in context immediately before His betrayal and crucifixion, the events which the gospel often refers to as His glorification. Wikipedia

Book: Gospel of John

Christian Bible part: New Testament

Order in the Christian part: 4

What Does John 17:17 Mean? ►

“Sanctify them in the truth; Your word is truth.

John 17:17(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

Just before He was taken from His disciples, the Lord Jesus prayed the most beautiful and profound prayer that the mortal ear has ever witnessed. Now that the hour of His crucifixion had arrived, Jesus prayed to the Father for the disciples He loved so dearly, that they would be sanctified in the truth, set apart, and made holy unto Him. Jesus prayed that they would be a consecrated, hallowed people for Himself: “Sanctify them by the truth; Your Word is truth.” 

The sanctification of a sinner saved by grace is both a specific act of the Holy Spirit that takes place at a moment in time, but it is also an ongoing process that is undertaken by the Holy Spirit in the heart of a believer.

Positional sanctification takes place at the moment of salvation. At that moment, we are justified in the sight of God and covered in Christ’s righteousness. Progressive sanctification is a lifelong process for the believer, as we continue to grow in grace, mature in the faith, and become gradually conformed into the image and likeness of the lovely Lord Jesus.

Positional sanctification happened in the past (the moment we were saved) and progressive sanctification continues in the present, but our full, final, and perfected sanctification will only be completed in the future, when we go to be with the Lord. It is not until we all reach unity in the faith, in the knowledge of the Son of God, (either through our physical death or the Rapture of the Church) that we will finally attain to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ, and our sanctification will, at last, be complete.

Every one of us that trusts in the Lord for salvation is already sanctified. We are positionally sanctified, for we are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people set apart unto God. But every believer is also going through a process of practical sanctification, for it is also a maturing in the faith as, day by day, we are being progressively conformed into the lovely image of the Lord Jesus Christ Himself.

It is through the Word of God that we are sanctified: “Sanctify them in the truth,” Jesus prayed, “Your Word is truth.” Yes, the Word of God is living and powerful and it is the Word of truth which has a beautiful, sanctifying effect on all God’s children. It is as we read and meditate on the truth of God’s Word, study its pages, hold its precious truth in our hearts, and trust our heavenly Father to complete the good work that He has started in us, that we find that Scripture has a powerful cleansing effect within, as we are set apart unto God – sanctified unto Him.

All that is of Christ and all that is recorded of Him – is contained in the Word is truth… and we are sanctified in the truth. Should we not praise the One Who has sanctified us, is continuing to sanctify us, and will one day bring our sanctification to its full and final completion? For He is Jehovah Meccadeshem – the LORD Who sanctifies us.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/john-17-17

John 17 is the seventeenth chapter of the Gospel of John in the New Testament of the Christian Bible. It portrays a prayer of Jesus Christ addressed to His Father, placed in context immediately before His betrayal and crucifixion, the events which the gospel often refers to as His glorification.

John 17:17

by Grant | Jun 20, 2018 | John | 0 comments

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17 Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth.

Previously our Lord had prayed that the Father would “keep” or protect the apostles from the poisonous dynamics of the world. Now He prayed that they would be set apart by truth that comes through the Word.

17 Sanctify them

The word “sanctify” means set apart. Jesus prayed that the Father would set the apostles apart by the truth of what they were taught. The issue here is the values that come from the truth—revealed truth.

The word “sanctify” does not mean to purify. The idea is to be set apart for some purpose. The purpose in this context was to carry on the ministry of Jesus on earth.

by Your truth [revealed truth].

God sanctifies people by “truth.” People can be sanctified only if they allow divine revelation to govern them.

Your word is truth.

We find God’s truth in propositions of His “word”; that is, in divine revelation. This is the only “truth” that is infallible.

PRINCIPLE:

The premise of being set apart unto God rests on revealed truth.

APPLICATION:

It is not enough to separate ourselves from the values of the world system; we need to learn more about God’s system of values, His worldview, His viewpoint on reality. We need to be kept from the one and confirmed in the other.

As the Word of God captures our heart, it will transform our lives. We must both understand and apply it to ourselves to make this happen. Sanctification of the believer’s ministry and life comes by this process.

John Chapter 17

John 17 – Jesus’ Great Prayer

“John Knox, on his death-bed in 1572, asked his wife to read to him John 17, ‘where’, he said, ‘I cast my first anchor.’” (Bruce)

A. Jesus prays concerning Himself.

1. (1a) Introduction.

Jesus spoke these words, lifted up His eyes to heaven, and said:

a. Jesus spoke these words: The Bible is filled with great prayers. We are impressed with Solomon’s prayer (1 Kings 8), Abraham’s prayer (Genesis 18), and Moses’ prayer (Exodus 32), but this prayer is by far the greatest recorded in the Bible.

i. Most of us know what it is to hear a true man or woman of God deep in prayer; there is something holy and awesome about it. Far beyond all that was this prayer Jesus prayed unto His God and Father, which is the only long, continuous prayer of Jesus recorded in the Gospels. The sentences are simple, but the ideas are deep, moving, and meaningful.

ii. “There is no voice which has ever been heard, either in heaven or in earth, more exalted, more holy, more fruitful, more sublime, than the prayer offered up by the Son to God Himself.” (Melanchthon, cited in Boice)

iii. Genuine prayer often reveals a person’s innermost being. John 17 is an unique opportunity to see the nature and heart of Jesus. In this prayer, Jesus will touch on many of themes developed in this Gospel: glory, glorify, sent, believe, world, love.

iv. Many of the same concerns of what is commonly called the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13) are here in this prayer.

· Prayer is repeatedly directed to God the Father.

· There is recognition of and concern for God’s name.

· There is concern for the work of the kingdom of God.

· There is concern for keeping from evil.

v. Yet there is something different in this prayer; Jesus did not pray just as He told His disciples to pray. “The request of our Lord thus given in John’s seventeenth chapter is clearly no prayer of an inferior to a superior: constantly there is seen in it the co-equality of the Speaker with The Father. The Two have but one mind… Where the Son speaks He is not seeking to bend The Father to Him: rather is He voicing the purpose of the Godhead.” (Trench)

vi. The New Testament tells us that Jesus has an ongoing, present work of intercession for His people (Romans 8:34, Hebrews 7:25). “The object being not so much to let us know what He said on a special occasion, as to show the constant attitude of His mind, the informing idea of His unceasing ‘intercession’ for us during the time of His absence.” (Trench)

b. Lifted up His eyes to heaven: This indicates the physical posture of Jesus as He prayed. This is a posture that we don’t usually associate with deep prayer. In the prayer customs of the western world, we often bow our head and close our eyes. Jesus prayed with the customs of prayer common in His own day (John 11:41, Mark 7:34, Psalm 123:1).

i. “In the sacred record, however, much more space is taken up by our Lord’s intercessions as he nears the end of his labors. After the closing supper, his public preaching work being ended, and nothing remaining to be done but to die, he gave himself wholly unto prayer. He was not again to instruct the multitude, nor to heal the sick, and in the interval which remained, before he should lay down his life, he girded himself for special intercession. He poured out his soul in life before he poured it out unto death.” (Spurgeon)

ii. The words lifted up His eyes to heaven also indicate that Jesus looked up in a hopeful sense and was not gloomy or downcast in this prayer. This is actually a prayer of faith and confidence, even victory – all the while acknowledging the reality of the conflict. “We so often understand this prayer as though it were rather gloomy. It is not. It is uttered by One who has just affirmed that He has overcome the world (John 16:33), and it starts from this conviction.” (Morris)

iii. This remarkable prayer is made with a heart and mind looking up towards heaven. Jesus made no mention of His problems or the decisions He must make. His heart and mind were fixed on the highest things, pledging Himself to the absolute fulfillment of God the Father’s will no matter what the cost, so that eternal life could come to others.

2. (1b) Jesus asks to be glorified.

“Father, the hour has come. Glorify Your Son, that Your Son also may glorify You,”

a. Father, the hour has come: Before, Jesus’ hour of glorification (beginning with His death) had not yet come (John 2:4; 7:8; 7:30; 8:20). Now, the hour has come (as Jesus said before at John 12:23).

i. Note the words: Father… Your Son… Your Son… You. This is a prayer deep and rich with relationship. Jesus prayed with a full and deep sense of the familial relationship and the natural hierarchy or order that exists between God the Father and God the Son.

ii. Father: “And herein he sets us an example: in all times of tribulation let us fall back upon our sonship, our adoption, and the fatherhood of our great God. To our Father let us go, for to whom else should a child so naturally fly?” (Spurgeon)

iii. The hour: “His faith thinks it but an hour: the midnight of Gethsemane, the morning of the scourging, the day of the crucifixion, all are but an hour, a short space. Now is he in trouble, for his time of travail is come; but he counts it as an hour, for joy of that which shall be born into the world by his grievous pangs. Thus his love and patience make him despise the time of shame and reckon it but a brief interval.” (Spurgeon)

b. Glorify Your Son: Jesus prayed first for Himself, but His petition was not selfish. His concern for Himself was actually a concern for the glory of the Father. The Son can only glorify the Father if the Father first answers the prayer of the Son, “Glorify Your Son.”

i. “It will bring no glory to the Father if Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross is not acceptable, or if the Son is not restored to his rightful place in the presence of the Father’s unshielded glory. That would mean the divine mission had failed, the purposes of grace forever defeated.” (Carson)

ii. “Father, the hour has come: glorify Thy Son: i.e. make plain to these there that the Man Jesus is also the God-Man; make it plain by His resurrection and ascension.” (Trench)

iii. “This glorification embraced His death, resurrection, and session at God’s right hand, as accredited Mediator.” (Dods)

iv. Jesus gave several reasons or grounds for this prayer, “Glorify Your Son.” If the God the Son made use or reasons or grounds in praying to God the Father, we should much more give attention to giving reasons and grounds for our requests before the throne of God.

· Because the hour has come (John 17:1).

· Because the Father will be glorified (John 17:1).

· Because authority had already been given to grant eternal life (John 17:2).

· Because Jesus is the only way to life (John 17:3).

· Because it finishes the work the Father sent the Son to perform (John 17:3).

c. The hour has come… Glorify Your Son: It is the cross (see John 12:27-33, 13:30-33, 21:18-19) that will glorify the Son. The cross was utter humiliation to the world, but it was an instrument of glorification in God’s eyes. This is an aspect of the foolishness and weakness of the cross (1 Corinthians 1:18, 1:23-25).

i. “To men the cross appeared an instrument of shame. To Christ it was the means of true glory.” (Morris)

ii. This prayer was wonderfully answered. “Yes, the Father glorified his Son, even when it pleased him to bruise him and to put him to grief. With one hand he smote, and with the other hand he glorified. There was a power to crush, but there was also a power to sustain working at the self-same time. The Father glorified his Son.” (Spurgeon)

iii. How different are most our prayers. “In one form or another we are constantly asking the Father to glorify us. Glorify me, O Father, we cry, by giving me the largest congregation in the town; by commencing a great revival in my mission, by increasing my spiritual power, so that I shall be greatly sought after. Of course, we do not state our reason quite so concisely; but this is really what we mean. And then we wonder why the answer tarries.” (Meyer)

d. That Your Son also may glorify You: In its counter-intuitive work, the cross glorified Jesus the Son and displayed the wisdom and the power of God (1 Corinthians 1:23-25). Yet it also glorified God the Father, by displaying His wise plan and great sacrifice in giving the Son to do such a work.

i. “The Son glorified the Father by revealing in this act [the cross] the sovereignty of God over evil, the compassion of God for men, and the finality of redemption for believers.” (Tenney)

ii. “Christ’s motive should be ours. When you ask a blessing from God, ask it that you may glorify God by it. Do you pine to have your health back again? Be sure that you want to spend it for him. Do you desire temporal advancement? Desire it that you may promote his glory. Do you even long for growth in grace? Ask it only that you may glorify him.” (Spurgeon)

3. (2-3) Jesus speaks of the source and nature of eternal life.

“As You have given Him authority over all flesh, that He should give eternal life to as many as You have given Him. And this is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent.”

a. You have given Him authority over all flesh: Jesus claimed to have authority over all flesh with the ability to give eternal life to mankind. This is a clear and startling claim to deity; no One but God could truthfully and knowingly make this claim.

i. Jesus here claimed “authority to determine the ultimate destiny of men.” (Takser)

ii. This gives us new hope for evangelism and missionary work, knowing that Jesus has authority over all flesh. Even for those who reject Jesus or are ignorant of Him, even if they do not know it or acknowledge it, Jesus has authority over them. We can pray in faith and ask Jesus to exercise that authority over those who have yet to repent and believe.

iii. You have given Him authority over all flesh: Philippians 2:5-11 is a demonstration of this, that all will recognize the authority of Jesus; every knee will bow and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord.

iv. The believer understands and glories in the authority of Jesus, especially considering the alternative. “Men and women cannot operate without authority. So if you put out one authority, another will come in. If you reject the authority of God, human authority will emerge.” (Boice)

b. That He should give eternal life to as many as You have given Him: Jesus understood that He was and is the One who grants eternal life to those given to Him by the Father.

i. “Christians often think of Jesus as God’s gift to us; we rarely think of ourselves as God’s gift to Jesus.” (Carson)

ii. This indicates something that we can dimly understand as a division of labor in the work of salvation between the Persons of the Godhead. Here we see that the Father gives some unto the Son, and the Son gives them eternal life through His work on the cross. Of course, the Holy Spirit also has His work in salvation, unmentioned in this particular passage.

iii. “Here the doctrines of a general and a particular redemption sweetly blend ‘As thou hast given him power over all flesh,’ they are all under Christ’s mediatorial government by virtue of his matchless sacrifice; but the object in view is specially the gift of everlasting life to the chosen people: ‘that he should give eternal life to as many as thou hast given him.’” (Spurgeon)

c. And this is eternal life, that they may know You: Eternal life is found in an experiential knowledge (ginosko) of both God the Father and Jesus Christ, God the Son.

i. “In this world we are familiar with the truth that it is a blessing and an inspiration to know certain people. Much more is it the case when we know God.” (Morris)

ii. “Life is active involvement with environment; death is the cessation of involvement with the environment, whether it be physical or personal.” (Tenney) Eternal life means that we are alive and active to God’s environment. If God and His spiritual environment does not affect (and even dominate) our life, then it can be said that we do not have or experience eternal life. If this is true, then we live life in the same dimension that animals live, and we exist as if we are dead to God and His environment.

iii. That they may know You: “In the Greek the verb is in the present subjunctive indicating the ‘knowledge’ is a growing experience.” (Tasker)

4. (4-5) The request is again stated, full of faith: Glorify Me.

“I have glorified You on the earth. I have finished the work which You have given Me to do. And now, O Father, glorify Me together with Yourself, with the glory which I had with You before the world was.”

a. I have glorified You on the earth: Jesus did not wait until His work on the cross to glorify God the Father. His entire life glorified God on the earth.

i. Jesus glorified the Father through His whole life, from His circumcision and dedication at the temple (Luke 2:21-23) through His quiet years of obedience in Nazareth (Matthew 2:23, 13:55).

ii. Jesus glorified the Father through His faith, obedience, and work through the years of His earthly ministry. Every sermon preached, every blind or sick person healed, every bit of instruction and training for the disciples, every confrontation with the corrupt religious leaders, every question answered, every loving touch – they all glorified God the Father.

b. I have finished the work: Jesus, with divine confidence and assurance, saw the work on the cross as already finished. There was (of course) a sense in which the work was not finished; but since Jesus is the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world (Revelation 13:8), there is a greater sense in which the work was already finished, completed in the heart and mind of God. Now it just had to be done.

i. There is a similar sense in which God sees our own work of transformation and perfection as already complete, before the fact. Now it has to be done.

ii. “There is a quiet recognition that Jesus has completed His task adequately, and brought glory to the Father in the process.” (Morris)

c. Glorify Me together with Yourself: Jesus asked the Father to glorify Him, but with the same glory that the Father Himself has. Jesus’ prayer was in no way an expression of independence, but of utter and continued dependence upon God the Father.

i. There are many men who cry out “glorify me,” and sometimes they even direct the cry to God under a more spiritual terminology. Yet their cry “glorify me” is almost always completely different than Jesus prayer, “Glorify Me together with Yourself” and the difference is normally between dependence and independence.

d. With the glory which I had with You before the world was: Jesus was aware of His pre-existence, and of the nature of that pre-existence. Jesus understood there was a time in eternity past when God the Son and God the Father enjoyed a shared glory.

i. Jesus could not truthfully or sanely pray this if He were not Yahweh Himself, equal with God the Father. In Isaiah 42:8 and 48:11, Yahweh proclaimed that He shares His glory with no one. If God the Father and God the Son share their glory, they must both be Yahweh.

ii. “He had one main petition: that the Father would receive him back to the glory he had relinquished to accomplish his task. This petition for a return to his pristine glory implies unmistakably his preexistence and equality with the Father. It confirms his claim that he and the Father are one (John 10:30).” (Tenney)

iii. The Gospel of John has emphasized the glory of Jesus throughout its record. John was careful to record the many ways Jesus referred to His own glory in this prayer.

· The life of Jesus was a manifestation of God’s glory, and the disciples beheld this glory (John 1:14).

· The miracles of Jesus manifested His glory (John 2:11).

· Jesus only ever sought the glory of His Father (John 7:18, 8:50).

· The revelation of glory is the reward of faith (John 11:40).

· Many times Jesus spoke of His coming passion and crucifixion as His coming glorification (John 7:39, 12:16, 12:23, 13:31).

· God the Son seeks to glorify God the Father (John 12:28).

· God the Father glorifies God the Son (John 13:31-32).

B. Jesus prays concerning the disciples.

Having taught and encouraged the disciples as much as He could on the eve of their despair, Jesus now did the great thing: He committed them to the Father in prayer.

1. (6-8) Jesus speaks of His mission among the disciples and their reception of it.

“I have manifested Your name to the men whom You have given Me out of the world. They were Yours, You gave them to Me, and they have kept Your word. Now they have known that all things which You have given Me are from You. For I have given to them the words which You have given Me; and they have received them, and have known surely that I came forth from You; and they have believed that You sent Me.”

a. I have manifested Your name to the men whom You have given Me: Jesus thought about the three or so years of ministry and teaching with His chosen disciples, and summarized it with this phrase. It indicates that Jesus did not simply teach about the name (character) of God, He manifested (displayed) that character.

i. Jesus lived out the love and goodness and righteousness and grace and holiness of God the Father; He manifested God’s name to them. “‘I manifested Thy Name,’ i.e. I revealed Thy nature. For any adequate name of a person or thing is the complete connotation of that person or thing.” (Trench)

ii. Believers today have a similar call and duty. Paul wrote that believers are like living letters, read by the world (2 Corinthians 3:2-3), with the responsibility to manifest the name and nature of God to a watching world.

b. The men You have given Me out of the world: Jesus chose His disciples after a night of prayer, expressing His total dependence upon God the Father in the choosing of the men (Luke 6:12-16). Truly, it could be said that God the Father gave these men to Jesus, and gave them out of the world.

i. Judas had departed from this group of disciples sometime earlier that evening (John 13:26-30). With Judas gone, Jesus could truly say, “The men You have given Me out of the world.”

c. They were Yours, You gave them to Me: Here is another hint at the workings of the Persons of the Trinity in what could be called a division of labor. There was some sense in which the disciples first belonged to God the Father, then were given to God the Son.

d. They have kept Your word: One might say that Jesus generously judged His disciples; but He saw a genuine work of God in them. For all their failures and faults, they had kept God’s word.

i. “He looked at them with the insight of faith, hope, and love, and realized their present devotion and their potential for the future.” (Bruce)

e. Now they have known that all things which You have given Me are from You: Jesus plainly told His disciples this shortly before (John 14:10-11) and in the more distant past (John 8:28-29). Jesus did or said nothing on His own initiative, but did and said all in complete dependence upon His God and Father.

f. They have known surely that I came forth from You: The disciples obviously did not understand everything about Jesus and His work, but at this point they were convinced of Divine origin of Jesus and His teaching.

i. “It is a rare and holy privilege to observe the divine Son of God not only formulating his prayers but formulating the grounds for his petitions. These grounds reflect the essential unity of Father and Son, and reveal that Jesus’ prayers for his followers trace their argument back to the inscrutable purposes of Deity.” (Carson)

g. They have believed that You sent Me: One might say that in these few verses, Jesus looked at salvation from two points of view. Each perspective is true from its point of view.

· John 17:6 explains their salvation in the election of God (the men You have given Me out of the world), seeing it from God’s point of view.

· John 17:8 explains their salvation in their faith (they have believed that You sent Me), seeing it from humanity’s point of view.

2. (9-10) Jesus directs His prayer.

“I pray for them. I do not pray for the world but for those whom You have given Me, for they are Yours. And all Mine are Yours, and Yours are Mine, and I am glorified in them.”

a. I pray for them. I do not pray for the world: Jesus specifically had His disciples in mind in this prayer. He did not pray in a general sense for the world; instead, Jesus prayed for the disciples who would carry His message of love and redemption to the world.

i. I pray for them: Trench says that the “I” is emphatic in this sentence.

ii. When Jesus said, I do not pray for the world it was not because He did not care for a lost and fallen world; it was to focus on His own disciples. “He was praying for the instrument He was creating, through which He would reach the world.” (Morgan)

iii. “If he does not pray for the world, it is not because he had no concern for the world; he is, indeed, the Saviour of the world (John 4:42; cf. 3:17; 12:47). But the salvation of the world depends on the witness of those whom the Father has given him ‘out of the world’ (see verses 21, 23), and it is they who need his intercession at this junction.” (Bruce)

iv. “I am now wholly employed for my disciples, that they may be properly qualified to preach my salvation to the ends of the earth. Jesus here imitates the high priest, the second part of whose prayer, on the day of expiation, was for the priests, the sons of Aaron.” (Clarke)

b. But for those whom You have given Me: One might say that this has in mind more than simply the eleven disciples, but also those who would believe on their testimony (as is specifically mentioned in John 17:20). Jesus had special focus upon them in prayer because He knew those disciples belonged to the Father (for they are Yours).

i. “There is an old proverb, and I cannot help quoting it just now; it is, ‘Love me, love my dog.’ It is as if the Lord Jesus so loved the Father that even such poor dogs as we are get loved by him for his Father’s sake. To the eyes of Jesus we are radiant with beauty because God hath loved us.” (Spurgeon)

c. All Mine are Yours, and Yours are Mine: Jesus already spoke of the shared glory between God the Father and God the Son (John 17:5). Here He spoke of their shared role in the life of the redeemed, that believers belong to both God the Father and God the Son.

i. Everything we have belongs to God, but not everything He has belongs to us. Anyone can say to God the Father “all mine are Yours”; but only Jesus could say “and Yours are Mine.”

ii. “Each has full title to the possessions of the other; they share the same interests and responsibilities.” (Tenney)

d. I am glorified in them: In a sense, this is what it means to be a believer, to be born again, to be a true follower of Jesus Christ – to have Him glorified in us. Jesus does not merely want to dwell in or live in the believer, but to be glorified in them.

i. “Just as the world’s values were all wrong concerning the cross, so were the world’s values all wrong concerning the apostolic band. In them the Son of God, none less, was actually glorified.” (Morris)

ii. The Apostle Paul later understood this, using phrases such as Christ in you, the hope of glory (Colossians 1:27) and noting that God’s work in us moves from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord (2 Corinthians 3:18).

iii. No one other than Jesus should be glorified in the believer. Leaders have a tendency to glorify themselves in their followers, but it should only be Jesus.

3. (11-12) Jesus’ first request for the disciples: Father, keep them.

“Now I am no longer in the world, but these are in the world, and I come to You. Holy Father, keep through Your name those whom You have given Me, that they may be one as We are. While I was with them in the world, I kept them in Your name. Those whom You gave Me I have kept; and none of them is lost except the son of perdition, that the Scripture might be fulfilled.”

a. Now I am no longer in the world, but these are in the world: Jesus prayed this entire prayer with His soon departure in mind. He realized that He would no longer remain in the world, but His disciples would. They therefore needed special prayer.

· They needed prayer because the unique three years of discipleship during His earthly ministry would be over.

· They needed prayer because of the circumstances surrounding the departure of Jesus; His betrayal, arrest, trial, beatings, crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension.

· They needed prayer because Jesus would not be there in His bodily presence to help them.

· They needed prayer because of the necessary role of the Holy Spirit; both for the sending of the Spirit and their constant reliance upon Him.

i. “Jesus is no longer in the world, already He has bid farewell to it, but the disciples remain in it, exposed without His accustomed counsel and defence.” (Dods)

b. And I come to You: This was not a phrase used to focus Jesus’ thoughts as He prayed, so that He might be conscious of praying in the presence of His Father. This was His recognition that His work on earth was almost done, and He was on His way to heaven.

c. Holy Father, keep through Your name those whom You have given Me: The disciples needed the prayer of Jesus and the power of God the Father to keep them.

i. They must be kept, continuing as disciples of Jesus. This was not obvious; in the Jewish world of that day no one continued as a disciple to a dead rabbi. Yet these disciples were to continue, to be kept as disciples to Jesus.

ii. “You have been redeemed; but you must still be kept. You have been regenerated; but you must be kept. You are pure in heart and hands; but you must be kept.” (Spurgeon)

iii. We need Jesus our intercessor (Romans 8:34, Hebrews 7:25) to pray for us, asking God the Father to keep us. Our continuing on in Jesus is not left to our own efforts alone. The world, the flesh, and the devil are so mighty, so pervasive, and so seductive that we could never keep ourselves in our own efforts. If we stay with Jesus, it is because Jesus has prayed for us “Father, keep them.”

· We need keeping from division: Keep them that they may be one.

· We need keeping from error.

· We need keeping from sin.

· We need keeping from hypocrisy.

iv. Keep through Your name: Jesus didn’t pray, “keep through an angel” or “keep through a church leader” or “keep through their own effort.” The work of keeping a believer is so significant that it takes the name of God – the whole character and authority of God.

v. There is some debate (mainly from Westcott and Hort) if the idea in John 17:11 is keep through Your name those whom You have given Me or keep through Your name which You have given Me. Westcott and Hort believed strongly that in this verse it was the name that was given, not the disciples – with the idea, “keep them in Me who am Thy name, They connotation, revelation, manifestation: keep them in unity with Me.” (Trench)

d. That they may be one as We are: The keeping work of God the Father in the disciples would not only keep them in Him, but it would also keep them together. Jesus prayed that they would be one, and one after the pattern of the unity of God the Father and God the Son (that they may be one as We are).

i. “The unity mentioned here is not simply a unity achieved by legislation. It is a unity of nature because it is comparable to that of the Son and the Father.” (Tenney)

ii. Their continued unity could not be assumed; it would make more sense for the disciples to scatter after the death of Jesus than it would for them to stay together.

iii. The unity Jesus prayed for among His people has a pattern. Even as the Father and the Son are one yet are not the same, we do not expect that genuine Christian unity will mean uniformity or unity of structure. It will mean unity of spirit, unity of heart, unity of purpose, and unity of destiny.

e. While I was with them in the world, I kept them in Your name: Jesus thought back over His three years of service with and unto the apostolic band. During that time He protected and guided them; He kept them. That keeping work Jesus did in the name of His Father, with His authority and power and according to His will.

i. “The Lord here, as Cyril remarks, compares His keeping of His own, to that by the Father – in a way only accountable by both Persons being of equal Power and Dignity.” (Alford)

ii. “By the Father’s power, imparted to Jesus, Jesus himself has guarded them as a treasure entrusted to him by the Father, and now he gives an account of his stewardship.” (Bruce)

iii. Jesus did not keep His own disciples in and through His own name, but in total reliance upon God the Father. It is far more foolish for us to think we can keep ourselves or others in our own name, but our own effort or authority or will.

iv. The basis of Jesus’ request was rooted in the name (character) of God and in His ownership of the disciple (those whom You gave Me).

f. None of them is lost except the son of perdition: There was one exception to Jesus’ work in keeping the disciples, Judas. This was because in fulfillment of the Scriptures; Judas was the son of perdition, the one destined to evil and destruction.

i. “Remark, it is not “I lost none, but the son of perdition.’ – Christ did not lose him (compare chapter 18:9, where there is no exception), but he lost himself.” (Alford)

ii. “It may be well to notice, for the English reader, that in the original, the noun perdition is the derivative of the verb perished. None perished but the one who should perish; whose very state and attribute it was to perish.” (Alford)

iii. “‘The son of perdition’ points to character rather than destiny. The expression means that he was characterized by ‘lostness’, not that he was predestined to be ‘lost’.” (Morris)

g. That the Scripture might be fulfilled: The Scriptures fulfilled by the betrayal of Judas were especially Psalm 41:9 and Psalm 109:8, especially noted in Acts 1:20. The treachery and treason of Ahithophel against King David was a prophesy of the treachery and treason of Judas against the Son of David.

4. (13-16) Jesus elaborates on the first request: keep them in My joy and away from the evil one.

“But now I come to You, and these things I speak in the world, that they may have My joy fulfilled in themselves. I have given them Your word; and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world.”

a. But now I come to You: Jesus again used this phrase, first noted in John 17:11. He prayed this prayer in full recognition of the soon accomplishment of His earthly work.

b. That they may have My joy fulfilled in themselves: Jesus prayed not only for the keeping of and the unity of His disciples, as if He only longed to leave behind good employees. He deeply cared for and prayed for joy fulfilled in their life. Specifically, Jesus prayed for His own joy to be fulfilled in His life.

i. “Their joy will be greater for remembering that Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, prayed for his followers.” (Carson)

ii. Jesus had a life filled with joy; He could speak of My joy. If He did not, this part of the prayer would make no sense. Truly Jesus was a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief (Isaiah 53:3). Nevertheless there was a joy and a satisfaction in the life experience of Jesus that surpassed the joy of any other who ever lived.

· His joy was rooted in unbroken fellowship with God His Father.

· His joy was the fruit of true faith and confidence in His Father.

· His joy came from seeing the great things God had done.

· His joy was never diminished by His own sin.

· His joy was never diminished by deception.

· His joy was never diminished by allowing even the smallest foothold to the devil.

iii. If Jesus was so concerned for joy among His disciples that He prayed for it, we can know that He is also concerned that we have joy. God’s purpose is to multiply joy in our lives, not to subtract it. The world, the flesh, and the devil would tell us something different, but God wants joy fulfilled in our lives.

c. I have given them Your word: Jesus faithfully delivered the word from God the Father unto His own disciples. Even Jesus saw Himself as a messenger.

i. I have given them Your word: “Not merely the oral teaching, but the whole revelation of The Father as manifested in the words and acts and personality of Jesus Christ.” (Trench)

ii. “See how the Lord Jesus himself takes all his teaching from the Father. You never hear from him any boast about being the originator of profound thoughts. No, he just repeated to his disciples the words he had received from the Father: ‘I have given unto them the words which thou gavest me.’ If Jesus acted thus, how much more must the messengers of God receive the word from the Lord’s mouth, and speak it as they receive it!” (Spurgeon)

d. I do not pray that You should take them out of the world: This prayer of Jesus cautions us against seeking refuge in Christian isolation; in modern day monasteries. Our goal is to be in the world but not of it or of the evil one; even as a ship is to be in the ocean, but not allowing the ocean to be in the ship.

· If we were taken from the world, the world would be in utter darkness and would perish; Jesus said, “You are the light of the world.” So, shine.

· If we were taken from the world, the world would not have us as a witness, to be a means of salvation unto them. So, win others to Jesus.

· If we were taken from the world, we would be denied the opportunity to serve Jesus in the same place we have sinned against Him. So, serve Jesus.

· If we were taken from the world, we would not see that there are aspects of God’s wisdom, truth, power and grace that are better appreciated on earth rather than in heaven. So, see the glory of the Lord.

· If we were taken from the world, we would be denied the place to prepare for heaven. There is no purgatory; our preparation is now. So, get ready for heaven.

· If we were taken from the world, we could not show the power of God’s grace to preserve us in the midst of difficulty. So, continue on.

i. Job and Moses and Elijah and Jonah all prayed that they would be taken out of the world, but God did not answer. He also wants us to stay in the world, to complete the work He gives us to do.

e. I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one: Jesus definitely wanted us to be in the world, but He did not want us to be evil, or marked by the evil one. Jesus didn’t pray that we would be taken out of the battle, but that we would be strengthened and protected in it.

i. “The genitive ponerou might indeed be construed as neuter (‘keep them from evil’) rather than masculine (‘from the evil one’); but the reference is more probably to the being who has been thrice mentioned already as ‘the ruler of this world’ (John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11).” (Bruce)

ii. Jesus prayed for His own to be kept from the evil one, the world he rules, and of all of his evil schemes and strategies.

· Kept from the evil of apostasy.

· Kept from the evil of worldliness.

· Kept from the evil of unholiness.

· It is not to be kept from the evil of trouble or hardship.

iii. “The evil one, apparently, often operates through the hatred of the world (cf. 15:18-16:4); and the disciples are going to need protection against such malice.” (Carson)

iv. All need to be kept. If we think of the young man, we appreciate how he must be kept from sin. The young have their own evil to battle against. Passions are strong, lusts seem to burn hot, and the pressure to conform to the world seems so much greater. Yet there is great danger for the older man. There is no description in the Scriptures of a young man falling into sin; think of Joseph and Daniel, and how they resisted sin. The examples of sin are from the lives of middle-aged men, like David and Solomon and Lot and many others.

v. In a sermon speaking on this text, Spurgeon spoke to those who are in sin, yet do not feel it to be evil: “There are some of you who do not feel sin to be an evil; and shall I tell you why? Did you ever try to pull a bucket up a well? You know that, when it is full of water, you can pull it easily so long as the bucket remains in the water; but when it gets above the water, you know how heavy it is. It is just so with you. While you are in sin, you do not feel it to be a burden, it does not seem to be evil; but if the Lord once draws you out of sin, you will find it to be an intolerable, a heinous evil. May the Lord, this night, wind some of you up! Though you are very deep down, may he draw you up out of sin, and give you acceptance in the Beloved!” (Spurgeon)

f. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world: Because Jesus could see His disciples as in Him, He could see them as not of the world, even as Jesus was not of the world. His call to His disciples was for them to be what they really were in Him.

i. Jesus didn’t simply say that His people were not of the world; He said they were not of the world even as He was not of the world – in other words, after the same pattern of Jesus’ not being of the world.

ii. It’s possible for someone to not be of the world, but in a very different way that Jesus was not of the world. They can be crazy, they can be violent, they can be weird, or it can be many things. But there was a particular way that Jesus was not of the world.

· Jesus was not of the world in His nature.

· Jesus was not of the world in His office.

· Jesus was not of the world in His character.

5. (17-19) Jesus’ second request for the disciples: sanctify them.

“Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth. As You sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world. And for their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also may be sanctified by the truth.”

a. Sanctify them by Your truth: Sanctify means to be set apart for God’s special pleasure and use. It implies holiness, being set apart from the corruption of the world and for God’s use.

i. “The word hagios (rendered ‘sanctify,’ ‘hallow,’ ‘consecrate’) means to set-apart-and-devote-to-God: whether it be things, or sacrificial animals, or men for His service.” (Trench)

ii. Jesus didn’t just leave the disciples to sanctify themselves. He prayed for their sanctification. This process, as the keeping process, is not left to us alone; it is a work of God in us and through us.

b. Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth: The dynamic behind sanctification is truth. The word of God read, heard, understood and applied.

i. “Sanctification is not effected apart from divine revelation.” (Morris)

ii. “The more truth you believe, the more sanctified you will be. The operation of truth upon the mind is to separate a man from the world unto the service of God.” (Spurgeon)

c. As You sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world: The thought of service is sandwiched by sanctification. The sanctification Jesus had in mind here was not primarily personal holiness (though that is included), but more so being set apart for God’s service and mission.

i. “He does not merely leave them into the world, but sends them into it, to witness to this same truth of God.” (Alford) “The word ‘mission’ comes from the Latin verb mitto, mittere, misi, missum, which means ‘to send’ or ‘dispatch.’ A mission is a sending forth.” (Boice) “They not merely remain in it because they can do nothing else; they are positively sent into it as their Master’s agents and messengers.” (Bruce)

ii. “Christ was the great Missionary, the Messiah, the Sent One; we are the minor missionaries, Sent out into the world to accomplish the Father’s will and purpose.” (Spurgeon)

iii. “Christ’s commission is on a higher scale than ours; for he was sent to be a propitiation and covenant-head, and so came into positions which it would be presumption for us to dream of occupying. Still, there is a likeness though it be only that of a drop to the sea.” (Spurgeon)

iv. Think of how Jesus came, and connect it to the way that He sends us into the world:

· Jesus did not come as a philosopher like Plato or Aristotle, though He knew higher philosophy than them all.

· Jesus did not come as an inventor or a discoverer, though He could have invented new things and discovered new lands.

· Jesus did not come as a conqueror, though He was mightier than Alexander or Caesar.

· Jesus came to teach.

· Jesus came to live among us.

· Jesus came to suffer for truth and righteousness.

· Jesus came to rescue men.

v. “If Jesus does not explicitly pray for the world at this time (verse 9), yet his prayer for the disciples involves hope for the world.” (Bruce)

d. And for their sakes I sanctify Myself: One should not think that Jesus was unsanctified up to this point. Yet now He was about to enter a new aspect of being set aside for God the Father and His purpose: to complete the work of the cross. It was through that finished work that the word of God and work of God would become fully effective in the lives of the disciples (that they also may be sanctified by the truth).

i. And for their sakes I sanctify Myself: “As both priest, altar, and sacrifice; and this Christ did from the womb to the tomb; at his death especially.” (Trapp)

ii. “Chrysostom paraphrases ‘I sanctify myself’ as ‘I offer myself in sacrifice’. Here is a Johannine counterpart to the Gethsemane prayer.” (Bruce)

C. Jesus prays concerning all believers.

1. (20) Jesus broadens the scope of His prayer.

“I do not pray for these alone, but also for those who will believe in Me through their word;”

a. I do not pray for these alone: Jesus prayed for His eleven disciples, but He also had the heart and the vision to pray beyond them. He prayed for those who would come to faith by the testimony of these disciples. He prayed for us.

i. “He prayed for them. He prays for us. He knew His intercession for them would prevail. He knows His intercession for us will prevail. Then let us rest in Him, with the rest of loving obedience and of surest confidence.” (Morgan)

b. Those who will believe in Me through their word: This shows that Jesus expected that the disciples’ soon failure would be only temporary. Others would hear from them, and many would come to belief in Jesus through the testimony of the disciples.

i. i. Jesus went to the cross knowing His work would endure. He didn’t have a vague hope in what God would do through the disciples. Jesus left His earthly work full of confidence in the work of God through the disciples.

ii. “The last section of Jesus’ prayer shows that he expected the failure of the disciples to be only temporary. The entire tone of the farewell discourse is built on the assumption that after the resurrection they would renew their faith and carry on a new ministry is the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Tenney)

iii. “By worldly standards of success Jesus had little to show for his mission.” (Bruce) Yet Jesus left His earthly work full of confidence in the work of God through the disciples.

2. (21) Jesus prays for unity among all believers, even as among the original disciples.

“That they all may be one, as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; that they also may be one in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me.”

a. That they all may be one: Jesus envisioned the great multitude before the throne of God of every nation, race, language, class, and social level (Revelation 7:9-10). Jesus prayed that they might rise above their different backgrounds and understand their unity; that they may all be as one.

i. It’s as if Jesus prayed with this in mind: “Father, I have prayed for the unity of the disciples You gave Me. Yet they are all Galileans, from this time and place. There will be countless others who also become disciples, and they will come from every nation, every language, every culture, every class, every status, from every age through the rest of history. Father, make them one.”

ii. “We are to be faithful to truth; but we are not to be of a contentious spirit, separating ourselves from those who are living members of the one and indivisible body of Christ. To promote the unity of the church, by creating new divisions, is not wise. Cultivate at once the love of the truth and the love of the brethren.” (Spurgeon)

iii. “Why are we not one? Sin is the great dividing element. The perfectly holy would be perfectly united. The more saintly men are, the more they love their Lord and one another; and thus they come into closer union with each other.” (Spurgeon)

iv. “Christ will have all his members to be one in spirit, one in rights and privileges, and one in the blessedness of the future world.” (Clarke)

b. That they all may be one, as You, Father are in Me, and I in You: Earlier in this prayer Jesus prayed specifically that the eleven disciples present at His prayer remain unified (that they may be one as We are, John 17:11). Here Jesus broadened the sense of that prayer to all believers, that they all may be one.

i. As in the previous prayer for the eleven, Jesus prayed that their unity would follow the pattern of the unity of the Godhead, specifically in the relationship between God the Father and God the Son. “If the Father is in him and he is in them, then the Father is in them: they are drawn into the very life of God, and the life of God is perfect love.” (Bruce)

ii. The repetition and extension of this prayer to all future believers is important. It shows that unity among the broader body of Jesus Christ was and is very important to Jesus.

iii. As You, Father, are in Me, and I in You also speaks to the truth that the foundation of our unity is the same as the foundation of unity between the Father and the Son: equality of person. We are all on the same ground at the cross.

iv. “Beloved, those in whom Christ lives are not uniform, but one. Uniformity may be found in death, but this unity is life. Those who are quite uniform may yet have no love to each other, while those who differ widely may still be truly and intensely one. Our children are not uniform, but they make one family.” (Spurgeon)

c. That they also may be one in Us: The oneness Jesus had in mind was the unity that comes from the shared life in both God the Father and God the Son.

i. As before, Jesus did not pray for uniformity or institutional unity among believers, but for unity rooted in love and a shared nature, bringing together the many different parts of Jesus’ one body. This isn’t a legislated uniformity seeking to unite wheat and tares, nor is it the unity of institutions. Jesus had in mind the true unity of the Spirit (Ephesians 4:3).

ii. We must believe that this prayer was answered, and that the church is one. Our failure is in failing to recognize and walk in that divine fact.

d. That the world may believe that You sent Me: This was a remarkable statement. Jesus essentially gave the world permission to judge the validity of His ministry based on the unity of His people. Unity among God’s people helps the world to believe that the Father sent the Son.

i. “Even when he prays for their unity, he looks beyond their unity to the still unconverted world which stands in need of the witness generated by that unity.” (Carson)

3. (22) Jesus prays that the church would be marked by glory.

“And the glory which You gave Me I have given them, that they may be one just as We are one:”

a. The glory which You gave Me I have given them: As God the Father shared His glory with God the Son (John 17:5), so Jesus gave glory unto His people.

i. There are many ways that Jesus gives His glory to His people.

· The glory of His presence.

· The glory of His Word.

· The glory of His Spirit.

· The glory of His power.

· The glory of His leadership.

· The glory of His preservation.

ii. In all these aspects, there is the essential aspect of the presence of Jesus, God the Son. Scripturally speaking, when God gives or displays His glory to His people, it is some type of manifestation of God’s presence. God’s glory is, in some way, the radiance or shining of His presence, His essential nature.

iii. The Apostle Paul also understood that Jesus gives His glory to His people: For it is the God who commanded light to shine out of darkness, who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. (2 Corinthians 4:6)

b. The glory which You gave Me: It is important to remember that the glory that God the Father gave to God the Son was glory that often appeared humble, weak, and suffering. It was glory that was ultimately displayed in radical sacrifice. The glory of Jesus is almost the opposite of the self-glory and vainglory of man.

i. The glory of Jesus was ultimately displayed in His work on the cross. Jesus often referred to it as His glorification (John 7:39, 12:16, 12:23).

ii. “Just as His true glory was to follow the path of lowly service culminating in the cross, so for them the true glory lay in the path of lowly service wherever it might lead them.” (Morris)

c. That they may be one: The presence of glory – among the Persons of the Godhead and the member of Jesus’ Church – this glory contributes to the oneness and unity of God’s people.

i. Where there is a sense of God’s glory, unity is so much easier. Lesser things that often divide us are set far in the background when there is a sense of God’s glory at work.

4. (23) Jesus prays for a unity founded in love.

“I in them, and You in Me; that they may be made perfect in one, and that the world may know that You have sent Me, and have loved them as You have loved Me.”

a. I in them, and You in Me; that they may be made perfect in one: Jesus again referred to the living, organic unity He prayed would exist among His people. This isn’t the totalitarian unity of coercion or fear, and it isn’t the unity of compromise. Jesus prayed for a unity of love and common identity in Him.

i. “Like sanctification, this oneness is simultaneously something already achieved and something that needs perfecting.” (Carson)

b. That the world may know that You have sent Me, and have loved them as You have loved Me: Jesus here took the idea introduced in John 17:21 (that the world may believe that You sent Me) and expanded it. The repetition is notable, and so is the expansion.

i. The idea that the unity of God’s people would display to the world that Jesus was truly sent from God the Father was so important to Jesus that He repeated it in the same short prayer.

ii. Then Jesus expanded the idea, now praying that the unity among generations of believers to come would also demonstrate to the world that Jesus loves His people, and loves them after the pattern of God the Father’s love for God the Son (and have loved them as You have loved Me).

iii. This reminds us of the importance of unity and love among Christians. It is as if Jesus gave the world permission to doubt both His mission and His love if the world does not see unity and love among believers.

· This is difficult, because sometimes the most unloving and critical among the followers of Jesus directly justify their divisiveness and sharp criticism as love, as in “I only demand that you be exactly as I am because I love you.”

· This is difficult, because sometimes it is true that there must be criticism, correction, and rebuke in the name of love.

· This is difficult, because even as we understand the words of Jesus here, we also understand that there are many, many other reasons why people do not believe (2 Corinthians 3:13-16, Ephesians 4:17-19, Romans 1:20-21). Christians have a great responsibility to display Jesus to the world through their love and unity, but often Christians are too quick to blame one another for an unbelieving world.

iv. “But what a sad thing was it, that a heathen should soon after have cause to say, No beasts are so mischievous to men, as Christians are to one another.” (Trapp)

5. (24) Jesus prays to be with His people, and for them to see His glory.

“Father, I desire that they also whom You gave Me may be with Me where I am, that they may behold My glory which You have given Me; for You loved Me before the foundation of the world.”

a. I desire that they also whom You gave Me may be with Me where I am: Jesus asked that the unity between Himself and His people be completed, even as He promised His disciples that it would be (John 14:2-3).

i. The words “I desire” mean something. They mean that Jesus longs for the consummation of all things, greatly desiring for His people to be gathered to Him in heaven. Jesus longed for heaven’s completion of all things.

ii. Where I am: Jesus was not yet in heaven, yet He spoke as if He already were there. In a sense, we are called to do the same, understanding that we are seated with Jesus in heavenly places even as we remain on earth (Ephesians 1:3 and 2:6).

iii. “Was he not carried away by the fervor of his devotion? Where was he when he uttered the words of our text? If I follow the language I might conclude that our Lord was already in heaven. He says, ‘rather, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory.’ Does he not mean that they should be in heaven with him? Of course he does; yet he was not in heaven; he was still in the midst of his apostles, in the body upon earth; and he had yet Gethsemane and Golgotha before him ere he could enter his glory. He had prayed himself into such an exaltation of feeling that his prayer was in heaven, and he himself was there in spirit.” (Spurgeon)

iv. Jesus promised something to His disciples (John 14:2-3) and then prayed that God the Father would perform it. Jesus did everything in dependence upon God the Father.

b. That they may behold My glory which You have given Me: This is what Jesus said would occupy the attention of His people in heaven – to behold the glory of Jesus. There must be something so deep, so enthralling, so vast to the glory of Jesus that it can occupy the attention of God’s people in eternity.

c. For You loved Me before the foundation of the world: Jesus said this in connection with the glory that God the Father gave to God the Son. This glory was given in the context of a love relationship, and a love relationship extending into eternity past.

i. This tells us that before anything was created, there was a love relationship between the Persons of the Godhead, the Trinity. Even if Jesus had not specifically told us this, we might have understood it by other Biblical truths, understanding that God is eternal (Micah 5:2) and that God is love (1 John 4:8 and 4:16). There was never a time when God did not love and was not love.

ii. Genuine love must have an object outside of itself to love; therefore love existed between the Persons of the Godhead before anything was created. The Triune nature of God is a not only Scripturally correct, it is a logical necessity given what we know of God through His revealed Word.

6. (25-26) The triumphant conclusion to Jesus’ prayer.

“O righteous Father! The world has not known You, but I have known You; and these have known that You sent Me. And I have declared to them Your name, and will declare it, that the love with which You loved Me may be in them, and I in them.”

a. O righteous Father! Jesus was about to go to the cross and undergo the entire ordeal of His passion – all of it planned and sent by God the Father. Yet Jesus, full of love and honor towards God the Father cried out in concluding this prayer, “O righteous Father!”

i. Jesus understood that His present and soon-to-be-endured pain did not diminish the righteousness of God the Father in even the smallest way.

b. The world has not known You, but I have known You: Jesus understood both that the world did not know and understand God the Father, and that He did know and understand Him.

c. And these have known that You sent Me: Jesus repeated the idea first mentioned in this prayer at John 17:8. Whatever their weaknesses and failings, the disciples understood that God the Father sent God the Son.

d. I have declared to them Your name, and will declare it: Jesus ended this great prayer on a note of faith and even triumph. He knew that He had done His work, and would finish His course.

i. In one sense, the entire work of Jesus could be summed up in saying that He declared to the disciples and to the world the name of God the Father. That is, He revealed and lived out the character and nature of God the Father as the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person (Hebrews 1:3).

ii. The world called Jesus a blasphemer (John 10:33), a drunk, a glutton, and an associate of sinners (Matthew 11:19), a demon-possessed pagan (John 7:20 and 8:48), and an illegitimate child (John 8:41). Jesus believed none of it, because none of it was true. At the end He could confidently say, “I have declared to them Your name, and will declare it.”

e. That the love with which You loved Me may be in them: Jesus received love from God the Father, and this love relationship was the strength and sustenance of His life. Here, concluding His great prayer, Jesus prayed that the same love that was His strength and sustenance would fill His disciples (both near and far).

i. This speaks to the essential place of love in the Christian life and community. Jesus thought it so important that He specifically prayed for love when He might have prayed for many other things.

· Take love from joy and you have only hedonism.

· Take love from holiness and you have self-righteousness.

· Take love from truth and you have bitter orthodoxy.

· Take love from mission and you have conquest.

· Take love from unity and you have tyranny.

f. And I in them: Jesus prayed that His disciples would not only be filled with the love of God the Father, but that they would also know the indwelling presence of Jesus Himself. This continues the emphasis on abiding and the indwelling Jesus from the words of Jesus earlier that evening (John 15:1-8).

©2018 David Guzik – No distribution beyond personal use without permission

Categories: John New Testament

Enduring Word

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What does John 17:17 mean?

Jesus continues to pray for the apostles (John 17:6), and by extension the believers who will follow them (John 17:20).

The term “sanctify” is translated from the Greek word hagiazō, the same root from which the term “saint” is derived. This means to separate something—to set it apart—for an intended purpose. Leading up to this request, Jesus has referred to these men as being “in” the world (John 17:11), but also not “of” the world (John 17:14). Being “separated,” in this case, does not mean a physical distance. It refers to a special purpose and a unique mission. All Christians are called on to be separated from the unbelieving world, spiritually (1 Corinthians 5:9–11) while also active in the world, practically (Matthew 5:13–16).

Earlier this same evening, Jesus indicated the disciples were made “clean” by the message they had accepted (John 15:3; 17:8). That message is the “word” of God: the overall statement of truth He sends. In this exact context, it does not refer only to the written Scripture, though that is one part of God’s message to us. The Greek term used here is logos, the same used by John at the beginning of this gospel in reference to Jesus (John 1:1). God’s message is personal, in the form of Jesus Christ (2 Corinthians 4:6; Hebrews 1:3) as well as textual, in the form of the Bible (2 Timothy 3:16–17).

Christ equates that message—the “word”—with truth, itself. What God tells us through the person, the teaching, and the message of Christ is that which is real. It is actual; it is “truth” in the deepest and most fundamental sense. When God identified Himself to Moses, He used the expression “I Am” (Exodus 3:14). This is a phrase Jesus also echoed, as recorded seven times in John’s gospel (John 6:35; 8:12; 10:7–9; 10:11; 11:25; 14:6; 15:1). God is truth, and salvation comes when we accept the reality of who He is, and who we are (John 4:24; Romans 1:21–25; Philippians 2:9–11).

Context Summary

John 17:6–19 continues the High Priestly Prayer of Jesus, prior to crossing into the garden of Gethsemane. After asking God the Father to glorify Him, so He may glorify the Father, Jesus now prays for His disciples. Earlier passages included Jesus’ warnings about persecution (John 16:1–4). His plea, here, is for the apostles’ continued faith in the face of that hardship. While this passage has application for all Christians, the immediate subject is Jesus’ immediate circle of closest disciples. After this, Jesus’ prayer will continue with an emphasis on all future believers.

Chapter Summary

In this passage, known as the High Priestly Prayer, Jesus speaks to God about three main topics. First is Christ Himself, asking God the Father to glorify Him so He can glorify the Father. Next, Jesus prays for the faith and courage in His closest disciples. Finally, He prays for those who will come to faith because of the apostles’ writing and teaching. This moment occurs before Jesus enters Gethsemane, where the other Gospels will record His final anguished prayers before being arrested (Matthew 26:36–46; Mark 14:32–42; Luke 22:39–46)

Sing Praises To Our Rock

VERSE OF THE DAY

Psalm 95:1-2 (The Message)

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Come, let’s shout praises to God, raise the roof for the Rock who saved us! Let’s march into his presence singing praises, lifting the rafters with our hymns!

VERSE OF THE DAY

Psalm 95:1-2 (New Living Translation)

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Come, let us sing to the Lord! Let us shout joyfully to the Rock of our salvation. Let us come to him with thanksgiving. Let us sing psalms of praise to him.

Let us sing praise and joyful song into the Lord the one we call the rock our firm foundation on whom we stand being along our thanksgiving let us shout and sing praises unto his holy name

Verse of the Day

for Thursday, November 20, 2014

Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation. Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.

Psalm 95:1-2

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…

Joy knows no better explanation than laughter and song. We sing to the Lord because we are joyful! Our music is not inhibited or held back, but exuberant and as full of sound as it is of heart. Thanksgiving brings us into the Father’s presence and it is our joy at being saved that leads us to sing.

My Prayer…

O most wonderful and glorious God, thank you so much for saving me from sin, death, law, and futility. Thank you for saving me and giving me the assurance, through your Holy Spirit, that I can come before you with exuberant and overflowing joy. Your love and grace have not only given me hope but have made me your child. Hear my heart and be blessed by my songs of praise. In the name of Jesus I pray and will shout your praise forever and ever. Amen.

The Thoughts and Prayer on Today’s Verse are written by Phil Ware. You can email questions or comments to phil@verseoftheday.com.

Today’s Verse: Psalm 95:1-2

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation. Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.

Psalm 95:1-2

Thoughts on Today’s Verse…

Joy knows no better explanation than laughter and song. We sing to the Lord because we are joyful! Our music is not inhibited or held back, but exuberant and as full of sound as it is of heart. Thanksgiving brings us into the Father’s presence and it is our joy at being saved that leads us to sing.

My Prayer…

O most wonderful and glorious God, thank you so much for saving me from sin, death, law, and futility. Thank you for saving me and giving me the assurance, through your Holy Spirit, that I can come before you with exuberant and overflowing joy. Your love and grace have not only given me hope but have made me your child. Hear my heart and be blessed by my songs of praise. In the name of Jesus I pray and will shout your praise forever and ever. Amen.

Psalm 95

Psalm 95 – God Worthy of Our Humble and Obedient Worship

This wonderful psalm is quoted and analyzed in Hebrews 3:7-4:13. There (Hebrews 4:7) it is said to be “in David.” This may indicate that David the Son of Jesse was the unattributed author, but it is also possible that the author of Hebrews simply referred to the Book of Psalms as “David’s Book.”

James Montgomery Boice observed regarding the commentary on Psalm 95 in Hebrews 3:7-4:13: “This is probably the most thorough citing of an Old Testament passage in the New Testament.”

A. The how and Whom of worship.

1. (1-2) Worship in many forms.

Oh come, let us sing to the LORD!
Let us shout joyfully to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before His presence with thanksgiving;
Let us shout joyfully to Him with psalms.

a. Let us sing to the LORD: The psalmist first mentions honoring God with song and doing so in community. Singing is not the only way to give honor and worship to God, but it is a chief and important way. Also, importantly, the exhortation is let us sing – that it should be done with the community of God’s people.

i. “The invocation to praise in Psalm 95:1-2, gives a striking picture of the joyful tumult of the Temple worship. Shrill cries of gladness, loud shouts of praise, songs with musical accompaniments, rang simultaneously through the courts.” (Maclaren)

ii. “Singing expresses human thought emotionally, and Christianity is a feeling religion. More particularly, singing expresses joy, and the Bible’s religion at its heart is joyful.” (Boice)

iii. Yet we are to sing to the LORD. “It is to be feared that very much even of religious singing is not unto the Lord, but unto the ear of the congregation. Above all things we must in our service of song take care that all we offer is with the heart’s sincerest and most fervent intent directed towards the Lord himself.” (Spurgeon)

b. Let us shout joyfully: God should be honored with a happy, enthusiastic heart. There is a place for a somber, reflective mood in worship, but it should not be the dominant tone. God’s people have much to shout joyfully about.

i. “Before making ourselves small before him (as we must, Psalm 95:6f.), we greet him here with unashamed enthusiasm as our refuge and rescuer (Psalm 95:1).” (Kidner)

ii. “It is a part of Christian duty, and certainly of Christian wisdom, to try to catch that tone of joy in worship which rings in this psalm.” (Maclaren)

c. To the Rock of our salvation: This is a title for God with both experiential and theological meaning. It points to a genuine depth of both thought and experience. Worship should not be simply saying things about God, but with thought and with a connection to what we have experienced or need to experience from Him.

d. Let us come before His presence: This means that worship should be done with a conscious sense of God’s presence. God’s people don’t sing into empty space; He is in their presence and they are in His presence. There is – or should be – a true connection between God and His people in worship.

i. His presence doesn’t mean God in the holy of holies, symbolized at the ark of the covenant. There could be no invitation to the community to come before His presence there. Even when they had the tabernacle and the temple, the Jewish people rightly understood the spiritual presence of God.

e. With thanksgiving: Our worship should express a heart of thanksgiving to our God, who has done so much for us.

i. “We are permitted to bring our petitions, and therefore we are in honour bound to bring our thanksgivings.” (Spurgeon)

f. Let us shout joyfully to Him with psalms: This is what the psalmist himself intended with this psalm. We can also surmise that he turned the attention of God’s people to the broader collection of psalms as a source of inspiration for their worship.

2. (3-5) The greatness of the God to be worshipped.

For the LORD is the great God,
And the great King above all gods.
In His hand are the deep places of the earth;
The heights of the hills are His also.
The sea is His, for He made it;
And His hands formed the dry land.

a. For the LORD is the great God: Understanding the greatness of God helps us to properly worship Him. Most everyone has some sense of awe or appreciation of greatness when in the presence of someone the culture regards as great. This is natural; it is even more natural and appropriate for us to deeply regard Yahweh as the great God and the great King above all gods.

i. “No doubt the surrounding nations imagined Jehovah to be a merely local deity, the god of a small nation, and therefore one of the inferior deities; the Psalmist utterly repudiates such an idea.” (Spurgeon)

ii. Adam Clarke observed regarding verse 3: “The Supreme Being has three names here: EL, JEHOVAH, ELOHIM, and we should apply none of them to false gods. The first implies his strength; the second his being and essence; the third, his covenant relation to mankind.”

b. In His hand are the deep places of the earth: One way God’s greatness is illustrated is by His mastery over creation. From the lowest valley to the highest hills, from the sea to the dry land, God’s hands formed them.

c. The sea is His, for He made it: The oceans and seas of this world belong to God. Whatever nation may make claim on the seas, or the concept of international waters may intend, the psalmist made a specific declaration that the sea is God’s.

i. “To the heathen, incidentally, the sea might represent a power even older than the gods, not conquered without a bitter struggle. It is a far cry from this to the simplicity of The sea is his, for he made it.” (Kidner)

ii. John Trapp thought of the contrast between the power of God and the old legend of King Canute of England, who commanded the tide of the sea to stop – but of course, it did not. “Canute confuted his flatterers (who told him that all things in his dominions were at his beck and check) by laying his command on the sea to come up no higher into his land, but it obeyed him not.”

iii. “If God owns the sea because he made it, he owns you, because he made you too. You are his creature, and by all the rights of creatorship you belong to him. He claims you; will you dispute the claim?” (Spurgeon)

3. (6-7a) Invitation to humble worship.

Oh come, let us worship and bow down;
Let us kneel before the LORD our Maker.
For He is our God,
And we are the people of His pasture,
And the sheep of His hand.

a. Oh come: There is a sweet sense of emphasis in these words. There is a gentle plea here: exhorting the readers to do what is right before God – which is also good for them.

b. Let us worship and bow down: The ideas of community (let us) and worship are repeated from earlier in the psalm, with an added sense of humility (bow down). The idea behind the Hebrew word worship is essentially to bow down; the thought is emphasized and given more intensity through repetition.

i. “In His presence, man must bow down before Him, man must kneel in the attitude of complete submission and obeisance. This is a truth of which we need to remind ourselves.” (Morgan)

ii. “It is not always easy to unite enthusiasm with reverence, and it is a frequent fault to destroy one of these qualities while straining after the other.” (Spurgeon)

iii. Worship and bow down: “Not before a crucifix, not before a rotten image, not before a fair picture of a foul saint: these are not our makers; we made them, they made not us. Our God, unto whom we must sing, in whom we must rejoice, before whom we must worship, ‘is a great King above all gods’: he is no god of lead, no god of bread, no brazen god, no wooden god; we must not fall down and worship our Lady, but our Lord; not any martyr, but our Maker; not any saint, but our Saviour.” (Boils, cited in Spurgeon)

c. Let us kneel before the LORD our Maker: In the previous verses the psalmist spoke of God’s mastery over all creation. Now he includes humanity itself among God’s creation. We owe humble worship to God because He made us. Worship is an obligation that the creature owes to the Creator.

i. The three main verbs in verse 6 are all connected with the idea of getting low and being humble. “Three distinct words are used here to express three different acts of adoration: 1. Let us worship, nishtachaveh, let us prostrate ourselves; the highest act of adoration by which the supremacy of God is acknowledged. 2. Let us bow down, nichraah, let us crouch or cower down, bending the legs under, as a dog in the presence of his master, which solicitously waits to receive his commands. 3. Let us kneel, nibrachah, let us put our knees to the ground, and thus put ourselves in the posture of those who supplicate.” (Clarke)

ii. The redeemed have at least two great reasons to humbly worship God. He is both their Maker and their Redeemer. They belong to Him twice over, in both creation and redemption.

iii. “We have the right to come before God with great gladness, but never without a sense of His majesty, and what is due to it.” (Morgan)

d. For He is our God, and we are the people of His pasture: Yahweh is also worthy of our humble worship because He is our God. The ancient Hebrew had something of a choice of gods, and it was a deliberate act of allegiance to say, “Yahweh is my God. I belong to Him and He belongs to me – I am like the sheep of His hand.”

i. “The sheep of his hand; which are under his special care and conduct, or government; which is oft expressed by the hand, as Numbers 4:28, 31:49, Judges 9:29.” (Poole)

ii. “The repeated reference to the ‘hand’ of Jehovah is striking. In it are held the deeps: it is…‘forming’ the land, as a potter fashioning his clay: it is a shepherd’s hand, protecting and feeding his flock (Psalm 95:7).” (Maclaren)

iii. “The familiar metaphors of verse 7 express his commitment, which is constant (our God), and his care, which is all-sufficing (his pasture) and personal (his hand). He is no hireling.” (Kidner)

B. Warning to those who reject worship.

1. (7b-9) Exhortation to the people of God.

Today, if you will hear His voice:
“Do not harden your hearts, as in the rebellion,
As in the day of trial in the wilderness,
When your fathers tested Me;
They tried Me, though they saw My work.”

a. Today, if you will hear His voice: The psalmist once again exhorts us to act, to hear the voice of God in the midst of their worship. God spoke to His people and He gave them and gave us a word of warning.

i. “If you want to worship God, make sure you do not harden your heart against God’s Word, or quarrel with him or test him, as the ancients did.” (Boice)

ii. This word of warning is important enough to be referenced three times in the book of Hebrews (Hebrews 3:7, 3:15, and 4:7). In Hebrews 4:7 the emphasis is on the word today, indicating the urgency of listening to God with a soft heart today.

iii. “This is the uniform time and tense of the Holy Ghost’s exhortations. He saith nothing about tomorrow, except to forbid our boasting of it, since we know not what a day shall bring forth. All his instructions are set to the time and tune of ‘Today, today, today.’” (Spurgeon)

iv. When the writer to the Hebrews quoted this passage in Hebrews 3:7, he specifically attributed it to the Holy Spirit: Therefore, as the Holy Spirit says. He was certain that the words of Psalm 95 were inspired by the Holy Spirit and that the Holy Spirit was Yahweh.

b. Do not harden your hearts, as in the rebellion: The rebellion and the day of trial refer primarily to the trial at Meribah (Numbers 20:1-13). But more generally, they speak of Israel’s refusal to trust and enter the Promised Land during the Exodus (Numbers 13:30-14:10). God did not accept their unbelief and condemned that generation of unbelief to die in the wilderness (Numbers 14:22-23 and 14:28-32).

i. The appeal do not harden your hearts means there is some aspect of the will involved when it comes to the hardness (or softness) of heart. Many regard a hard or soft heart as something that just happens to someone and is beyond his ability to control. Here the Holy Spirit indicates differently.

ii. The strong words in the second half of this psalm are connected to the sweet, stirring words of the first half. Humble worship of Yahweh and the recognition of Him as Creator and God should lead to a listening ear and a soft, surrendered heart toward Him. There is something wrong when the worshipper does not obey and trust God.

iii. Charles Spurgeon suggested several ways that we may harden our hearts.

· Some harden their hearts by resolving not to demonstrate emotion in regard to spiritual things.

· Some harden their hearts by delaying a real relationship with God.

· Some harden their hearts by pretending doubts and foolish criticism.

· Some harden their hearts by getting into evil company.

· Some harden their hearts by focusing on silly amusements “all intended to kill time and prevent thought upon divine things.”

· Some harden their hearts by indulging in a favorite sin.

c. When your fathers tested Me: We test God by our unbelief. Israel saw the work of God, yet would not trust Him at Meribah or in the wilderness in general. We are warned not to do the same.

i. To reject God’s invitation today surely means to test Him. “Is God to wait as a lackey upon you? You deserve his wrath, will you slight his love? He speaks in amazing tenderness, will you exhibit astounding hardness?” (Spurgeon)

ii. Though they saw My work means that God gives us reason to trust Him. To ignore those reasons is to provoke and to test God.

iii. “Every one comes in the Christian life, once at least, to Kadesh-barnea [Numbers 13:26]. On the one hand the land of rest and victory; on the other the desert wastes. The balance, quivering between the two, is turned this way by faith; that by unbelief. Trust God, and rest. Mistrust Him, and the door closes on rest, to open to wanderings, failure, and defeat.” (Meyer)

2. (10-11) Warning the people of God.

“For forty years I was grieved with that generation,
And said, ‘It is a people who go astray in their hearts,
And they do not know My ways.’
So I swore in My wrath,
‘They shall not enter My rest.’”

a. For forty years I was grieved: God offered the generation that came out of Egypt the opportunity to take the Promised Land by faith. Their unbelieving rejection of God’s offer grieved Him for forty years. It was evidence that they went astray in their hearts, away from humble confidence in Him as Creator and Redeemer.

i. “The desert wanderings were but a symbol, as they were a consequence, of their wanderings in heart. They did not know His ways; therefore they chose their own.” (Maclaren)

ii. “O the desperate presumption of man, that he should offend his Maker ‘forty years!’ O the patience and long suffering of his Maker, that he should allow him forty years to offend in!” (Horne)

iii. Astray in their hearts: “Their heart was obstinately and constantly at fault; it was not their head which erred, but their very heart was perverse.” (Spurgeon)

b. They do not know My ways: To know God is to trust Him. Unbelief is evidence of small or faulty knowledge of God.

i. “My ways; either, 1. My laws or statutes, which are frequently called God’s ways. Or rather, 2. My works, as it is expressed, Psalm 95:9, which also are commonly so called. They did not know nor consider and remember those great things which I had wrought for them and among them.” (Poole)

c. So I swore in My wrath: God did not honor the unbelief of His people. It was an insult to Him, and prompted a solemn, angry declaration from Him.

i. “Be not wilfully, wantonly, repeatedly, obstinately rebellious. Let the example of that unhappy generation serve as a beacon to you; do not repeat the offences which have already more than enough provoked the Lord.” (Spurgeon)

d. They shall not enter My rest: God condemned Israel’s generation of unbelievers to die in the wilderness, so that a generation of faithful believers could inherit the Promised Land, His appointed place of rest for His people.

i. “There can be no rest to an unbelieving heart. If manna and miracles could not satisfy Israel, neither would they have been content with the land which flowed with milk and honey.” (Spurgeon)

ii. “By ending on this note the psalm sacrifices literary grace to moral urgency. If this is a psalm about worship, it could give no blunter indication that the heart of the matter is severely practical: nothing less than a bending of wills and a renewal of pilgrimage.” (Kidner)

(c) 2020 The Enduring Word Bible Commentary by David Guzik – ewm@enduringword.com

                                                        GOD THE FATHER, GOD THE SON, AND GOD THE HOLY SPIRIT

ACTS 1:8 But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.”

The Lord God Almighty, Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit welcomes you here on today. This blog site was ordained by God for such a time as this and it is marvelous in our eyes.

The vision for Internet blogging via the web was given to me by the Holy Spirit in March 2011.  Prior to this divine call from God I had been sending out daily devotionals for over 20 years via my personal email.

God has spoken and the manifestation of His spoken word is revealed in this place and the rest is history.

God Himself declares in Isaiah 55:11-So shall my word be which goes forth from my mouth; it will not return to Me empty,  without accomplishing what I desire and without succeeding in the matter for which I sent it.

Words can not express the joy that I feel in my heart by your presence here on today. I know without a doubt that your visit to this place where the Holy Spirit everlasting presence resides is by divine appointment. 

There is indeed fresh “manna” from heaven sent here daily from God in heaven to humanity on earth. This  spiritual food is for those who have a hunger and thirsty for righteousness.  Jesus quoted these words in John 6:35- “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst.

For those of you who are seeking a close and “personal relationship” with God through Jesus Christ, you have found a resting place to do just that here so sit down and take a seat at the Lord’s table where the feast of the Lord is being spread throughout ALL nations.

Your bible, a note pad and pen, humility and a desire to learn and be lead by God’s Holy Spirit is the road to new beginnings for you if this is your desire.

Today is a time and season of teaching, learning, serving and giving hope to this dark world.  

Tell the Lord thank you is indeed a place where the “SPIRIT” and “PRESENCE” of God will meet you at every click on this site.

Regardless of what part of the world you may be viewing from, I say “welcome” and let’s enjoy the ride with Jesus together.

God bless you and I do tell the Lord thank you for the presence of His Holy Spirit and your visit here on today.

Let’s enjoy the ride with Jesus together!

Debra

I do not own the picture or video on this blog site nor do I claim ownership of it..

Prayer for Psalm 95:2 ►

“Let us enter His presence with thanksgiving; let us shout triumphantly to Him in song.”

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Thanksgiving For The Advent Of Jesus

Father, You are our God of hope and love. Thank You for sending Your only begotten Son into the world, so that sinful man might be forgiven of their sins and be given peace with God, through the sacrifice of the precious life of Christ Jesus.

Thank You for the joy and hope that this time of Advent brings into the hearts of all those who trust in Jesus. Thank You for the good news of the gospel of Christ that brings man back into sweet fellowship with their Creator, and for the perfect peace and glorious hope that He has placed into the hearts of all who trust on His name.

Thank You, Lord, that Jesus is coming again to set up His eternal kingdom on earth as You have promised, and that we who are members of His body will rule and reign with Him for 1000 years.

Thank You, for the hope and love and peace that You gave to mankind in the Person of our Lord Jesus Christ. To Him be all the praise and glory at this special time of Advent and throughout the coming year. In Jesus’ name,

Amen.

Category: Prayers for Advent

Source: https://prayer.knowing-jesus.com/Psalm/95/2

Prayer for Psalm 95 ►

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Thanksgiving For The Advent Of Jesus

Father, You are our God of hope and love. Thank You for sending Your only begotten Son into the world, so that sinful man might be forgiven of their sins and be given peace with God, through the sacrifice of the precious life of Christ Jesus.

Thank You for the joy and hope that this time of Advent brings into the hearts of all those who trust in Jesus. Thank You for the good news of the gospel of Christ that brings man back into sweet fellowship with their Creator, and for the perfect peace and glorious hope that He has placed into the hearts of all who trust on His name.

Thank You, Lord, that Jesus is coming again to set up His eternal kingdom on earth as You have promised, and that we who are members of His body will rule and reign with Him for 1000 years.

Thank You, for the hope and love and peace that You gave to mankind in the Person of our Lord Jesus Christ. To Him be all the praise and glory at this special time of Advent and throughout the coming year. In Jesus’ name,

Amen.

“Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms.”

(Psalm 95:2)

Category: Prayers for Advent

Praying through Psalm 95:8

Heavenly Father, thank You for the lessons You would teach me from Israel’s past history, and help me not to fall into the same attitude of unbelief or exhibit a spirit of complaint. What a lesson to learn – that unbelief or a complaining heart is the cause of broken fellowship with the Father. Thank You for Your promise to supply all my needs according to Your riches in glory, and may I never take Your abundant supply for granted. Help me examine my heart today and to correct any areas in my life that dishonour Your holy name. This I ask in Jesus’ name, AMEN.

“Harden not your heart, as in the provocation, and as in the day of temptation in the wilderness:”

(Psalm 95:8)

Source: Verse of the day for Psalm 95:8

Source: https://prayer.knowing-jesus.com/Psalm/95

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Faith is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen. .. where deep calls unto deep – from the deepest heaven, to the depths of our beings.

My Daily Prayers and Readings for 08/08/2010

< >< My Prayer >< >

Today’s readings and devotion are rich in wisdom and lessons to be heard and learned; like the call, faith must be realized and accepted. For I believe we are visitors under the sun, Your children, spiritual beings placed in a world under the sun as physical beings along with all of Your beautiful creations, given the freedom of choice. And the biggest choice is in and through faith realized and accepted of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen. Faith strong enough to exist and grow in the unknown with and in that which is revealed by You to each of us according to Your will and purpose for us no matter what that be or how it threatens that which we have come to know for faith must be firm in Your word not in our knowledge or interpretation of Your word at any given point in our walk and growth. For all that we know is designed to give understanding, but faith exist and is strongest beyond understanding and that which we know or can come to know under the sun; where deep calls unto deep – from the deepest heaven, to the depths of our beings.

Abba Father in the name of Christ Jesus who lives within me through the Holy Spirit I pray that You create in me a clean heart, and renew a right spirit within me, for my one walk in and with Jesus today. Asking that You bless me and mine in fulfillment of Your will and keep us from evil and pain. In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Amen.

< >< Today’s Jesus Calling Daily Devotion >< >

July – “Whoever believes in me, as the scripture has said, streams of living water will flow from within him.” John 7:38

Today – I SPEAK TO YOU from deepest heaven. You hear Me in the depths of your being. Deep calls unto deep. You are blessed to hear Me so directly. Never take this privilege for granted. The best response is a heart overflowing with gratitude. I am training you to cultivate a thankful mind-set. This is like building your house on a firm rock, where life’s storms cannot shake you. As you learn these lessons, you are to teach them to others. I will open up the way before you, one step at a time.

PSALM 42:7 (NKJV), PSALM 95:1-2, MATTHEW 7:24-25

< >< Today’s Mass Readings >< >

Audio Link

Reading 1 Wis 18:6-9

The night of the passover was known beforehand to our fathers,

that, with sure knowledge of the oaths in which they put their faith,

they might have courage.

Your people awaited the salvation of the just

and the destruction of their foes.

For when you punished our adversaries,

in this you glorified us whom you had summoned.

For in secret the holy children of the good were offering sacrifice

and putting into effect with one accord the divine institution.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 33:1, 12, 18-19, 20-22

R. (12b) Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.

Exult, you just, in the LORD;

praise from the upright is fitting.

Blessed the nation whose God is the LORD,

the people he has chosen for his own inheritance.

R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.

See, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,

upon those who hope for his kindness,

To deliver them from death

and preserve them in spite of famine.

R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.

Our soul waits for the LORD,

who is our help and our shield.

May your kindness, O LORD, be upon us

who have put our hope in you.

R. Blessed the people the Lord has chosen to be his own.

Reading 2 Heb 11:1-2, 8-19 or 11:1-2, 8-12

Brothers and sisters:

Faith is the realization of what is hoped for

and evidence of things not seen.

Because of it the ancients were well attested.

By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place

that he was to receive as an inheritance;

he went out, not knowing where he was to go.

By faith he sojourned in the promised land as in a foreign country,

dwelling in tents with Isaac and Jacob, heirs of the same promise;

for he was looking forward to the city with foundations,

whose architect and maker is God.

By faith he received power to generate,

even though he was past the normal age

—and Sarah herself was sterile—

for he thought that the one who had made the promise was

trustworthy.

So it was that there came forth from one man,

himself as good as dead,

descendants as numerous as the stars in the sky

and as countless as the sands on the seashore.

All these died in faith.

They did not receive what had been promised

but saw it and greeted it from afar

and acknowledged themselves to be strangers and aliens on earth,

for those who speak thus show that they are seeking a homeland.

If they had been thinking of the land from which they had come,

they would have had opportunity to return.

But now they desire a better homeland, a heavenly one.

Therefore, God is not ashamed to be called their God,

for he has prepared a city for them.

By faith Abraham, when put to the test, offered up Isaac,

and he who had received the promises was ready to offer his only son,

of whom it was said,

“Through Isaac descendants shall bear your name.”

He reasoned that God was able to raise even from the dead,

and he received Isaac back as a symbol.

Gospel Lk 12:32-48 or 12:35-40

Jesus said to his disciples:

“Do not be afraid any longer, little flock,

for your Father is pleased to give you the kingdom.

Sell your belongings and give alms.

Provide money bags for yourselves that do not wear out,

an inexhaustible treasure in heaven

that no thief can reach nor moth destroy.

For where your treasure is, there also will your heart be.

“Gird your loins and light your lamps

and be like servants who await their master’s return from a wedding,

ready to open immediately when he comes and knocks.

Blessed are those servants

whom the master finds vigilant on his arrival.

Amen, I say to you, he will gird himself,

have them recline at table, and proceed to wait on them.

And should he come in the second or third watch

and find them prepared in this way,

blessed are those servants.

Be sure of this:

if the master of the house had known the hour

when the thief was coming,

he would not have let his house be broken into.

You also must be prepared, for at an hour you do not expect,

the Son of Man will come.”

Then Peter said,

“Lord, is this parable meant for us or for everyone?”

And the Lord replied,

“Who, then, is the faithful and prudent steward

whom the master will put in charge of his servants

to distribute the food allowance at the proper time?

Blessed is that servant whom his master on arrival finds doing so.

Truly, I say to you, the master will put the servant

in charge of all his property.

But if that servant says to himself,

‘My master is delayed in coming,’

and begins to beat the menservants and the maidservants,

to eat and drink and get drunk,

then that servant’s master will come

on an unexpected day and at an unknown hour

and will punish the servant severely

and assign him a place with the unfaithful.

That servant who knew his master’s will

but did not make preparations nor act in accord with his will

shall be beaten severely;

and the servant who was ignorant of his master’s will

but acted in a way deserving of a severe beating

shall be beaten only lightly.

Much will be required of the person entrusted with much,

and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”

< >< Today’s Video Reflection >< >

To watch video Reflection on today’s Gospel click link at bottom on this email:

Behold this Heart which has so loved men that it has spared nothing, even to exhausting and consuming itself, in order to testify its love. In return, I receive from the greater part only ingratitude, by their irreverence and sacrileges, and by the coldness and contempt they have for me in this Sacrament of love… I come into the heart I have given you in order that through your fervor you may atone for the offenses which I have received from lukewarm and slothful hearts that dishonor me in the Blessed Sacrament. — Third apparition of Jesus to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

< >< Online Sources for Devotion Scripture References & Daily Mass Readings >< >

Link to Devotion Scriptures unless noted from New International Version BibleGateway.com

Links for today’s readings from USCCB using the New American Bible or

Links for today’s readings from EWTN using the Revised Standard Version Catholic Edition

For audio link to today’s readings from USCCB using the New American Bible click:

http://ccc.usccb.org/cccradio/NABPodcasts/10_08_01.mp3

For link to today’s video Reflection http://www.usccb.org/video/reflections.shtml

< >< Other sources of inspiration on God’s Word >< >

EWTN

Moody Radio Online

Today in the Word Radio Online

Today in the Word

Today in the Word – Today’s Devotional

< >< Bible Online >< >

BibleGateway.com

< >< One Walk >< >

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