Chaos Against God

Psalm 2

Why are the nations so angry?
    Why do they waste their time with futile plans?

The kings of the earth prepare for battle;
    the rulers plot together
against the Lord
    and against his anointed one.

“Let us break their chains,” they cry,
    “and free ourselves from slavery to God.”

But the one who rules in heaven laughs.
    The Lord scoffs at them.

Then in anger he rebukes them,
    terrifying them with his fierce fury.

For the Lord declares, “I have placed my chosen king on the throne
    in Jerusalem,[a] on my holy mountain.”

The king proclaims the Lord’s decree:
“The Lord said to me, ‘You are my son.[b]
    Today I have become your Father.[c]

Only ask, and I will give you the nations as your inheritance,
    the whole earth as your possession.

You will break[d] them with an iron rod
    and smash them like clay pots.’”

10 

Now then, you kings, act wisely!
    Be warned, you rulers of the earth!

11 

Serve the Lord with reverent fear,
    and rejoice with trembling.

12 

Submit to God’s royal son,[e] or he will become angry,
    and you will be destroyed in the midst of all your activities—
for his anger flares up in an instant.
    But what joy for all who take refuge in him!

Why the nations cause uprise and scenes and uproar with trouble? Who’d people cause wrongs and chaos? The Government cause uproar and rise against God for he is our father meant to be glorified and respected in honor not in chaos and uproar and rebuked

Psalm 2 is the second psalm of the Book of Psalms, beginning in English in the King James Version: “Why do the heathen rage”. In Latin, it is known as “Quare fremuerunt gentes”. Psalm 2 does not identify its author with a superscription, but Acts 4:24–26 in the New Testament attributes it to David. Wikipedia

Psalm 2

Psalm 2 – The Reign of the LORD’s Anointed

Like many psalms, the theme of Psalm 2 is emphasized in the final verse. We can defy God and perish, or we can surrender to Him and be blessed. The psalm itself does not identify its author, but Acts 4:25-26 clearly attributes it to David.

A. The rage of nations and the laugh of God.

1. (1-3) The nations rebel.

Why do the nations rage,
And the people plot a vain thing?
The kings of the earth set themselves,
And the rulers take counsel together,
Against the LORD and against His Anointed, saying,
“Let us break Their bonds in pieces
And cast away Their cords from us.”

a. Why do the nations rage: The psalmist seems genuinely mystified. The nations have no reason to rage against God, and they have no benefit in raging against Him. Their opposition against God is nothing but a vain thing.

b. The rulers take counsel together: Since the time of Babel, men have continued to band themselves together against God. Their mistaken belief is that two or more men united against God have a better chance than one man set against God.

c. Against the LORD and against His Anointed: They oppose both the LORD and His Anointed. Anointed speaks of the Christ, the Anointed One. Since Jesus is the perfect representation of the Father (John 10:30, 14:9), opposing God the Father, is to oppose Jesus. If you are against Jesus, you are against God the Father.

d. Let us break Their bonds in pieces: Those who oppose the LORD and His Anointed think of God as a bondage-bringer. This attitude is evidence of spiritual insanity, because God is a bondage-breaker, not a bondage-bringer.

i. “To a graceless neck the yoke of Christ is intolerable, but to the saved sinner it is easy and light…. We may judge ourselves by this, do we love that yoke, or do we wish to cast it from us?” (Spurgeon)

2. (4-6) The LORD’s laugh from heaven.

He who sits in the heavens shall laugh;
The LORD shall hold them in derision.
Then He shall speak to them in His wrath,
And distress them in His deep displeasure:
“Yet I have set My King
On My holy hill of Zion.”

a. He who sits in the heavens shall laugh: God looks at the way man plots against Him and He laughs. God isn’t afraid or confused or depressed about the opposition of man. God laughs at it.

i. God laughs because He sits in the heavens. He sits as the Great King on a glorious throne. He isn’t pacing back and forth in the throne room of heaven, wondering what He should do next. God sits in perfect peace and assurance.

ii. God laughs because He sits in the heavens. It isn’t an earthly throne He occupies; it is the throne of heaven with authority over all creation. What does heaven have to fear from earth?

iii. “God does not tremble. He does not hide behind a vast celestial rampart, counting the enemy and calculating whether or not he has sufficient force to counter this new challenge to his kingdom. He does not even rise from where he is sitting. He simply ‘laughs’ at these great imbeciles.” (Boice)

iv. “This derisive laughter of God is the comfort of all those who love righteousness. It is the laughter of the might of holiness; it is the laughter of the strength of love. God does not exult over the sufferings of sinning men. He does hold in derision all the proud boastings and violence of such as seek to prevent His accomplishment of His will.” (Morgan)

b. The LORD shall hold them in derision: Through the centuries, many have opposed God and His Kingdom in Jesus Christ. Each one of these opponents shall be frustrated and crushed.

i. A famous example of an opponent of Christianity was the Roman Emperor Diocletian (reigning A.D. 284-305). He was such a determined enemy of Christians that he persecuted the church mercilessly, and fancied that he had defeated Christianity. He ordered the making a medal with this inscription: “The name of Christianity being extinguished.”

ii. Diocletian also set up two monuments on the frontier of his empire with these inscriptions:

Diocletian Jovian Maximian Herculeus Caesares Augusti for having extended the Roman Empire in the east and the west and for having extinguished the name of Christians who brought the Republic to ruin

Diocletian Jovian Maximian Herculeus Caesares Augusti for having everywhere abolished the superstition of Christ for having extended the worship of the gods

iii. Diocletian is dead and gone, a footnote on the pages of history. The fame and glory of Jesus Christ is spread over all the earth. The LORD shall hold them in derision.

c. He shall speak to them in His wrath: God laughs in heaven, but He doesn’t remain inactive. He laughs, but He doesn’t only laugh. Before He acts against defiant mankind, He first speaks to rebellious humanity.

i. This shows the great mercy of God. He has every reason and every right to simply act against defiant men. Love and mercy compel God to speak a word of warning before He acts.

d. I have set My King on My holy hill of Zion: God wants defiant mankind to know that He has established a King. The defiant men closest in view in the psalm are kings and rulers, and God especially wants them to know there is a King greater than they are. God’s King is established (set), and established in Jerusalem (Zion).

B. God’s decree to the nations.

1. (7-9) The decree of the Son.

“I will declare the decree:
The LORD has said to Me,
‘You are My Son,
Today I have begotten You.
Ask of Me, and I will give You
The nations for Your inheritance,
And the ends of the earth for Your possession.
You shall break them with a rod of iron;
You shall dash them to pieces like a potter’s vessel.’”

a. I will declare the decree: The following passage indicates that this is the LORD’s Anointed Himself speaking. He will declare the decree that God the Father spoke to Him.

b. You are My Son, today I have begotten You: The LORD’s Anointed recalls what God the Father spoke to Him, identifying Him as the Son of the Father and emphasizing His standing as begotten of the Father.

i. The writer to the Hebrews quotes this passage in Hebrews 1:5 as evidence of the deity of Jesus and superiority to all angels. He mentions the more excellent name Jesus received, greater than all the angels. This is the “name” Son. While angels are sometimes called the sons of God in a generic sense (Job 1:6), the Father never said “My Son” to any angel in a specific sense. That is reserved for God the Son, the Second Person of the Trinity.

ii. Begotten is also an important idea, as a contrast to created. Jesus was not created; rather He created everything that was created (Colossians 1:16-17). Begotten describes a relationship between two beings of the same essential nature and being, but we create things of a different essential being and nature than ourselves. A man creates a statue but begets a child.

c. I will give You the nations for Your inheritance: The LORD’s Anointed holds the nations as His inheritance. He will rule over all nations and all judgment is committed to Him (John 5:22).

i. Revelation 11:15 describes an exciting consummation of this inheritance: Then the seventh angel sounded: And there were loud voices in heaven, saying, “The kingdoms of this world have become the kingdoms of our Lord and of His Christ, and He shall reign forever and ever!”

d. You shall break them with a rod of iron: The LORD’s Anointed has such power over the nations that they are like clay pots that he can shatter with a blow from a rod of iron. This shows why it is so foolish for the nations to defy the LORD and His Anointed. There is no reason and no benefit to their defiant opposition.

2. (10-12) The decree to the nations about the Son.

Now therefore, be wise, O kings;
Be instructed, you judges of the earth.
Serve the LORD with fear,
And rejoice with trembling.
Kiss the Son, lest He be angry,
And you perish in the way,
When His wrath is kindled but a little.
Blessed are all those who put their trust in Him.

a. Be wise, O kings: After the words of warning from the LORD’s Anointed, the psalmist counsels the kings of the earth to give up their foolish defiance of the LORD.

b. Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice with trembling: The psalmist calls the kings of the earth to surrender to God, giving Him proper reverence. In this submitted, surrendered place they can rejoice – yet with appropriate trembling.

c. Kiss the Son: This primarily has in mind the kiss of submission, where a dignitary receives the humble kiss of an inferior. It also hints at the affection God wants in relationship to Him. God wants us to recognize our proper place before Him, but to also rejoice in Him and be affectionate in our relationship.

i. “Kissing was the token of subjugation and friendship.” (Clarke)

ii. If the kings and judges of the earth are commanded to humble themselves before the LORD’s Anointed, recognizing His total superiority, then what of the rest of us? Speaking to the kings and judges therefore includes all of humanity.

d. Blessed are all those who put their trust in Him: Those who defy God are broken, but those who depend on Him are blessed. The psalmist leaves the choice with everyone: broken or blessed?

(c) 2020 The Enduring Word Bible Commentary by David Guzik – ewm@enduringword.com

Categories: Old Testament Psalms

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What Does Psalm 2:1 Mean? ►

Why are the nations in an uproar And the peoples devising a vain thing?

Psalm 2:1(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

There are many times in history when the people of God could have asked this very question: why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing? It is certainly a question that many of us have asked over the years as we see an increasing hatred of God, a growing contempt for Jesus Christ.. His anointed Son, a multiplication of sin and evil and an ever greater distain towards those that believe in the death, burial and resurrection of Christ.. for the forgiveness of sins and life everlasting.

But asking.. why the heathen rage in this way, is not simply a question that we are asking, as we live in this lost and dying world, with its increasingly corrupt world system. This is the question that God the Father told us that He Himself would ask in derision.. about those that oppose Him.. especially during the fast-approaching Great Tribulation – as the armies of the world gather together to make war against Christ. In their anger and rage we read that they will try to prevent His glorious return to earth and His everlasting reign of righteousness.. when He comes in power, with the armies of heaven.. to set up His millennial kingdom.

The Bible tells us that a time of great distress and terrible trouble is coming when a great global federation of ungodly rulers and corrupt nations will unite in passionate hatred against God. They will come together with a unified resolution to prevent the prophesised, second coming of Christ. In their satanic hatred of God, these ungodly men will seek to wrench away Christ’s legitimate authority and His God-given sovereign right to rule the nations of the earth, in equity and peace.

As we watch the frenetic desire of the globalist minority seeking to deceive the nations by calling that which is good- ‘evil’ and that which is evil- ‘good’, we see other prophetic scriptures being fulfilled – for we read in Hosea: My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge: because they hast rejected truth.. and Isaiah mourns: My people are gone into captivity for lack of knowledge. And although these Old Testament passages are addressed directly to the nation of Israel – all scripture is profitable for the Church, for through it we can discover truths and principles that can comfort, encourage.. teach, train, rebuke and direct us in our Christian walk through this life.

Before the foundation of the world, God formed His plan of redemption, whereby the first creation in Adam, (which fell).. would be replaced with a new Creation in Christ – (Who is our life). From the beginning. God’s purpose for the human race was for man to have dominion over the earth. But Adam sinned.. and when man fell, when Satan stole man’s authority over the earth. However, God purposed that His only begotten Son – the eternal Son of God and second Member of the Trinity, would be the one and only Man Who would restore what man lost. He would be His anointed King.. Who would govern His people Israel and become the Head of the mystic Body, which is the Church.

The content of Psalm 2, together with many prophetic passages about the second coming of Christ, gives much insight into God’s attitude towards the raging heathens; the kings and rulers of the earth that plot against God and those that imagine a vain thing against the Lord and His anointed King. The satanic plans of these foolish, prideful people is to break free from the sovereign rule of their Creator God. Their goal is to become independent of His plans and purposes. But we read that God holds these people in derision. He laughs at them in scorn – for God has never rescinded his original plan and purposes for man to rule the earth. And the Lord JESUS is the King, Whom God the Father has purposed will rule and reign, for ever and ever.

God is long-suffering towards the fallen race of man and is not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to faith in Christ Jesus Indeed the gospel of grace has been preached to the nations for almost 2000 years.. and the invitation to believe on the Lord Jesus Christ for the salvation of our soul and life everlasting has been preached freely to whosoever will come by faith.

But knowing that the Day of the Lord will come like a thief.. we are a people who by God’s grace ought to walk in spirit and truth. May we seek to conduct ourselves in holiness of heart, as we look for the coming of the Christ – our blessed hope and great Redeemer.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/psalm-2-1

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/psalm-2-1

What does Psalm 2:1 mean?

This psalm starts with a rhetorical question. It’s ridiculous to think that one can overpower, undermine, or escape the will of God. The psalmist is amazed that so many people, cultures, and even entire nations are united in evil intent. He indicates that their intention is “in vain.” It is doomed to fail. The following verse explains why these efforts are doomed: they’re plans to overthrow God and His Anointed One (Psalm 2:2). “Anointed” is from the Hebrew term mashiyach, from which English derives the word “Messiah.” Greek translates this as Christos, from which English derives the title of “Christ.”

Rage and anger are sinful mankind’s typical response to God. That includes hatred aimed at those who choose to obey God, instead of following the world (1 Peter 4:3–4; John 15:18–19).

Whether an individual or a nation or several nations plot against God, the plot is bound to fail. God is far too wise and too powerful to fall to puny mankind. Pharaoh and the Egyptians learned this truth the hard way. They planned to enslave God’s people, the Hebrews, indefinitely. Even after God persuaded Pharaoh by ten severe plagues to release the Hebrews from slavery, Pharaoh dispatched his cavalry to pursue the Hebrews. At the Red Sea, God told Moses, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the LORD…The LORD will fight for you, and you have only to be silent” (Exodus 14:13–14). Then the Lord dried up the Red Sea so His people could cross (Exodus 14:21–22). But the waters returned and engulfed the pursuing Egyptian cavalry (Exodus 14:26–28). Pharaoh’s plot failed miserably when he opposed the Lord.

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed

What does Psalm 2:2 mean?

This clearly identifies the aggressors behind the evil plot mentioned before (Psalm 2:1), as well as the target of their aggression. The kings and rulers of the nations are the aggressors. The word “set” here implies deliberate preparation and arrangement. Translations such as the NASB render this as “take their stand,” suggesting the aggressors’ hostile intent. They gather their armies in military formation and brainstorm how to overthrow the Lord and His Anointed.

The English word “Anointed” here comes from the Hebrew term mashiyach. This is the origin of the word “Messiah.” In Greek, the same concept is expressed with the title Christos, from which comes the English title “Christ.” This points to Jesus, Israel’s Messiah (Acts 2:36). In Old Testament times three significant roles were inaugurated by the anointing with oil. They were the roles of prophet, priest, and king. The prophet delivered the Lord’s messages to the people; the priest represented the people before the Lord; the king ruled the people on behalf of the Lord.

Jesus, the promised Messiah, is all three: prophet, priest, and king. He came to earth as the Word and declared God’s message (John 1:14, 18). He is the believers’ High Priest, interceding for us (Hebrews 4:14–16). And someday He will rule the earth as King of kings and Lord of lords (Revelation 17:14; 19:16).

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

What does Psalm 2:3 mean?

Prior verses asked, rhetorically, why the world would rebel against an all-powerful God (Psalm 2:1–2). The purpose of their rage and plotting is an attempt to throw off the authority of God and His Anointed One. The ungodly cannot stand being controlled by the supreme Ruler of the universe and His Son (Acts 4:23–28).

Of course, the evil desire to usurp God and take His place is nothing new. Before the dawn of human history, Lucifer—the Devil—attempted to elevate himself to God’s throne. But his futile exercise of self-will led to his expulsion from heaven (Isaiah 14:12–15). Adam and Eve rejected God’s will concerning His command not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 3:1–6). Their rebellion resulted in their expulsion from the garden of Eden, death for them and all their descendants, and a curse on nature (Genesis 3:16–19). In the era of the Judges, desire to reject God’s will and replace it with self-will brought the Israelites into bondage to their enemies. Every man did what was right in his own eyes, even if it was wrong in God’s eyes (Judges 17:6).

Ephesians 2:3 indicts the world of unbelievers for choosing to pursue self-will rather than God’s will. Isaiah 53:6 says we have all gone astray like sheep and turned to our own way. Indeed, “the heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick” (Jeremiah 17:9).

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed

What does Psalm 2:4 mean?

Those who resist God’s rule, His will, and His truth do so in rage, frenzy, plotting, and scheming (Psalm 2:1–3). Scripture reveals the sovereign Lord’s response to the unbelieving world’s desire to overthrow Him. “The nations” (Psalm 2:1) and “the kings…and the rulers” (Psalm 2:2) think of themselves as the ultimate authority. They plan together to rebel against God’s will and His Word.

Even so, God “sits” in the heavens, a reference to His throne (Isaiah 6:1), from which He rules heaven and earth. From that lofty, secure vantage point, He sees the frantic, rebellious nations, and He laughs. The nations’ plot is ridiculous—it is laughable. God is not intimidated by tantrums from human beings. All the power of all the nations is no match for God. Isaiah 40:15 declares: “Behold, the nations are like a drop from a bucket, and are accounted as the dust on the scales; behold, he takes up the coastlands like fine dust.” And Isaiah 40:17 says, “All the nations are as nothing before him, they are accounted by him as less than nothing and emptiness.”

When proud mankind wanted to make a name for themselves by building a tower at Babel that reached high into the sky, Scripture says God came down to see it (Genesis 11:5). He then divided their common language into many languages and scattered the builders far from the construction site (Genesis 11:1–9). Similarly, according to the following verse, God will terrify the rebellious nations.

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

What does Psalm 2:5 mean?

“The nations,” meaning the cultures and people groups of a fallen world, plot to usurp God from His throne and establish themselves as the sole rulers of earth (Psalm 2:1–3). God has other plans (Psalm 2:4). In His wrath, He will speak to them and terrify them in His fury.

These words preview Revelation chapter 20, where we read that the Devil gathers the nations for battle. The armies are so numerous that they resemble the sand of the sea (Revelation 20:8). The militant nations march on “the camp of the saints and the beloved city” (Revelation 20:9). In His wrath and fury, God rains fire from heaven upon the armies and consumes them.

The wrath of God is not a pleasant subject. Naturally, most would rather hear about God’s love. However, wrath is as much a part of God’s character as is His love. Sin naturally angers God, and His wrath abides on all sinners who refuse to believe on His Son, who paid the penalty for sin and offers forgiveness to all who believe on Him. Scripture states: “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him” (John 3:36).

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

What does Psalm 2:6 mean?

The unbelieving world thinks it can throw off God’s truth and His will (Psalm 2:1–3). That will only earn a laugh, and wrath, from an all-powerful God (Psalm 2:4–5). The sovereign Creator of the universe will set His King—the Lord Jesus Christ, Israel’s Messiah—on Mount Zion, His holy hill. The book of Psalms mentions Zion thirty-nine times. David, who wrote Psalm 2, conquered Zion when it was a city of the Jebusites (2 Samuel 5:7). Later, Zion referred to the temple area in Jerusalem and eventually it became synonymous with Jerusalem. God’s “holy hill” refers to the temple mount.

Someday, Jesus, God’s Anointed (Acts 4:23–28), will return to earth, subdue His enemies, and rule from Jerusalem (Isaiah 2:1–4; Malachi 3:1). In the angel Gabriel’s address to Mary, he prophesied concerning Jesus: “He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end” (Luke 1:32–33). As surely as King David ruled from Jerusalem, so King Jesus will rule from Jerusalem!

Context Summary

Psalm 2:1–6 portrays nations arrayed in military fashion against the Lord God and His anointed King. They have plotted to throw off the Lord’s control. However, their scheme causes the Lord to laugh and to defeat their evil plan. He addresses them in His wrath and terrifies them in a display of His fury. After being released by the Sanhedrin, the Jews’ ruling body in the first century, Peter and John returned to a gathering of believers and reported what had transpired. Together, the believers quoted Psalm 2:6 and applied it to the risen Son of God (Acts 4:23–30).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed

What does Psalm 2:7 mean?

The psalmist, David (Acts 4:25), refers to God’s mention of the king’s right to rule. He recalls the covenant God made with him. This is a permanent decree authorizing Davidic rule. Second Samuel 7:13 provides God’s promise at the time of David’s coronation. God promised: “He shall build a house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever.” This statement connects the idea of the promised Messiah being referred to as a “Son” of God.

Further, God referred to his relationship with David’s promised descendant—the One with a “kingdom forever” as a father-son relationship. He said, “I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a son” (2 Samuel 7:13–14). The covenant relationship between God and King David finds a greater fulfillment in the relationship of Father-Son that exists between God and His Son, the Messiah. John 3:16 emphasizes this relationship by stating, “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son…”

Context Summary

Psalm 2:7–9 records the words of God’s Son, Israel’s future King. They appropriately follow God’s promise to establish His Son on the throne of David, and to deal with rebellious nations in His wrath and fury. Faced with King Jesus’ victory over His foes, the psalmist’s counsel to the rebels follows in verses 10–12. Revelation 19:11–15 describes the King’s outpouring of God’s wrath and fury on the rebel nations during the end times.

What does Psalm 2:8 mean?

Traditionally, a father would provide an inheritance for his son, payable upon the father’s death. In the parable of the prodigal son, the prodigal asked his father for the inheritance in advance. In that case, it was a selfish request that sprang from a wrong motive (Luke 15:11–13). God, on the other hand, invites David to ask for his inheritance, including all the nations and all of the earth.

Although David’s kingdom was sizeable, the fulfillment of this promise awaits Messiah’s kingdom that follows His return to earth (Revelation 19:11; 20:4). Isaiah 9:7 points to the vast kingdom God’s eternal Son will possess. This prophecy reads: “Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the LORD of hosts will do this.”

Zechariah 2:11 anticipates Messiah’s possession of the nations by proclaiming: “And many nations shall join themselves to the LORD in that day, and shall be my people. And I will dwell in your midst, and you shall know that the LORD of hosts has sent me to you.”

Context Summary

Psalm 2:7–9 records the words of God’s Son, Israel’s future King. They appropriately follow God’s promise to establish His Son on the throne of David, and to deal with rebellious nations in His wrath and fury. Faced with King Jesus’ victory over His foes, the psalmist’s counsel to the rebels follows in verses 10–12. Revelation 19:11–15 describes the King’s outpouring of God’s wrath and fury on the rebel nations during the end times.

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

What does Psalm 2:9 mean?

This verse predicts that the Lord’s Anointed will smash the rebellious nations when He returns to earth to establish His kingdom (Revelation 19:11; 20:4). Not one unrighteous person will be left to enter the kingdom (Titus 3:4–7). He will use a rod of iron to shatter the rebels just as a potter smashes a vessel into pieces.

The Hebrew word for “rod” is sē’bet, often applied to a shepherd’s crook. At other times it refers to a scepter. Reportedly, Pharaoh used his scepter to smash vessels that represented rebellious nations or rebellious cities in his empire. Revelation 19:15 unveils what happens to the rebellious nations when Jesus returns to earth. The verse declares: “From his mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations, and he will rule them with a rod of iron.”

Psalm 89:22–26 predicts the Messiah’s conquest and rule: “The enemy shall not outwit him; the wicked shall not humble him. I will crush his foes before him and strike down those that hate him. My faithfulness and my steadfast love shall be with him, and in my name shall his horn be exalted. I will set his hand on the sea and his right hand on the rivers. He shall cry to me, ‘You are my Father, my God, and the Rock of my salvation.'”

Context Summary

Psalm 2:7–9 records the words of God’s Son, Israel’s future King. They appropriately follow God’s promise to establish His Son on the throne of David, and to deal with rebellious nations in His wrath and fury. Faced with King Jesus’ victory over His foes, the psalmist’s counsel to the rebels follows in verses 10–12. Revelation 19:11–15 describes the King’s outpouring of God’s wrath and fury on the rebel nations during the end times.

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

What does Psalm 2:10 mean?

The psalmist, David (Acts 4:25), advises the kings to be wise, and he issues a warning to the rulers. It is unwise to oppose God considering His ability to execute His wrath on all who refuse to be warned. The idea of opposing God and defying His truth is laughable (Psalm 2:1–6). Those who oppose God and His Anointed One will face utter destruction (Psalm 2:7–9).

Even without the return of Messiah to rule the world (Revelation 19:11; 20:4), there are biblical examples of God humiliating those who arrogantly defy Him. Two Babylonian kings learned firsthand that God is not to be trifled with. In a display of his inflated ego, King Nebuchadnezzar erected a 90-foot-tall golden image on the plain of Dura. He commanded everyone to fall down at the sound of music and worship the image (Daniel 3:1–7). Later, he boasted about Babylon as a great city that he had built (Daniel 4:30). Such egotistical idolatry incurred God’s wrath. God humbled Nebuchadnezzar by driving him from men to eat grass like an ox for seven years (Daniel 4:33–37). Sometime later, Nebuchadnezzar’s grandson Belshazzar was King of Babylon, and he, too, was proud and idolatrous (Daniel 5:1–4). God responded to Belshazzar’s wickedness by allowing the Medes and Persians to kill him and seize his kingdom (Daniel 5:30–31).

Acts 12:20–23 records the surprising death of Herod Agrippa I, another proud king who refused to honor God. When King Herod attired himself, sat on his throne, and received the worship of his subjects, immediately an angel of the Lord struck him down, and he died of a worm infestation.

Context Summary

Psalm 2:10–12 closes the song by urging kings and rulers of the earth to make a wise decision. The psalmist counsels them to change their rebellious attitude and come to friendly terms with the Lord’s anointed Son. Doing so will avert the Son’s anger and avoid eternal punishment. Also, coming to friendly terms with God’s Son will provide refuge and blessing. This conveys a message like that of John the Baptist. He urged everyone in Israel to repent in preparation for the arrival of Messiah and His kingdom (Matthew 3:1–3; John 1:8). Jesus invited those who heard Him to repent and believe on Him (Matthew 4:17; 11:28; Luke 5:32; 13:3, 34). He said no one can enter the kingdom without being born again (John 3:3). The apostles Peter and Paul, too, urged those who heard them preach to turn to Jesus for forgiveness (Acts 2:38–39; 17:30–31; Romans 10:1–13).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed

What does Psalm 2:11 mean?

David, the author of this psalm (Acts 4:25), calls upon the rebellious kings and rulers to serve the Lord with fear and rejoice with trembling; that is, with respect and strong emotion. Instead of opposing the Lord (Psalm 2:1–6), the kings and rulers had an opportunity to do His bidding reverently and with deep joy.

Service that combines reverence and joy is the hallmark of genuine Christianity. Psalm 100:2 implores God’s people to “serve the LORD with gladness!” Further, God’s people ought to humbly acknowledge His authority and ownership. Scripture states, “Know that the LORD, he is God! It is he who made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture” (Psalm 100:3).

The early believers who trusted in Christ on the Day of Pentecost modeled this kind of relationship to God. Acts 2:42–47 reports that they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, broke bread together, prayed, shared their goods with one another, gave generously to help the needy, ate with glad hearts, and praised God. In Psalm 5:7 the psalmist shared his resolve to respond to God’s abundant, steadfast love to enter God’s house and bow down toward the Lord’s temple in fear of Him. This attitude of trust and devotion to God should be repeated by all believers.

Context Summary

Psalm 2:10–12 closes the song by urging kings and rulers of the earth to make a wise decision. The psalmist counsels them to change their rebellious attitude and come to friendly terms with the Lord’s anointed Son. Doing so will avert the Son’s anger and avoid eternal punishment. Also, coming to friendly terms with God’s Son will provide refuge and blessing. This conveys a message like that of John the Baptist. He urged everyone in Israel to repent in preparation for the arrival of Messiah and His kingdom (Matthew 3:1–3; John 1:8). Jesus invited those who heard Him to repent and believe on Him (Matthew 4:17; 11:28; Luke 5:32; 13:3, 34). He said no one can enter the kingdom without being born again (John 3:3). The apostles Peter and Paul, too, urged those who heard them preach to turn to Jesus for forgiveness (Acts 2:38–39; 17:30–31; Romans 10:1–13).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed

What does Psalm 2:12 mean?

The psalmist, David (Acts 4:25), continues his counsel to the kings and rulers by telling them to kiss the Son to avert His anger. This contrasts with their plans to defy God (Psalm 2:1–6).

“Kiss” suggests homage. When Elijah was depressed in the desert and feeling that he was the only one who worshiped the Lord, the Lord told him, “Yet I will leave seven thousand in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal, and every mouth that has not kissed him” (1 Kings 19:18). In biblical times a kiss on the cheek was an expression of friendship. Judas, the betrayer of Jesus, feigned friendship with Jesus by kissing him (Matthew 26:47–49). In 1 Thessalonians 5:26, Paul commanded the Christians to “greet all the brothers with a holy kiss.” Today, at least in Western cultures, a firm handshake and/or a hug is an equivalent sign of friendliness.

This psalm makes it clear that failure to establish a friendly relationship with the Anointed One brings about His anger and wrath that results in damnation (John 3:36). Revelation 20:10–15 reveals that this fate involves being cast into the lake of fire. However, those who “kiss the Son” are blessed and protected by Him (John 3:16–18). This is a summary of the gospel message: that we can be saved only through faith in Jesus Christ (John 14:6; Acts 4:12; 16:31).

Context Summary

Psalm 2:10–12 closes the song by urging kings and rulers of the earth to make a wise decision. The psalmist counsels them to change their rebellious attitude and come to friendly terms with the Lord’s anointed Son. Doing so will avert the Son’s anger and avoid eternal punishment. Also, coming to friendly terms with God’s Son will provide refuge and blessing. This conveys a message like that of John the Baptist. He urged everyone in Israel to repent in preparation for the arrival of Messiah and His kingdom (Matthew 3:1–3; John 1:8). Jesus invited those who heard Him to repent and believe on Him (Matthew 4:17; 11:28; Luke 5:32; 13:3, 34). He said no one can enter the kingdom without being born again (John 3:3). The apostles Peter and Paul, too, urged those who heard them preach to turn to Jesus for forgiveness (Acts 2:38–39; 17:30–31; Romans 10:1–13).

Chapter Summary

Psalm 2, written by King David (Acts 4:25), begins by questioning the nations’ frenzied attempt to overthrow the Lord and His anointed King, Jesus. Godless cultures plot to rid themselves of divine authority. But trying to escape God’s will is ridiculous. He will direct His wrath toward them and asserts He has established His King upon Mount Zion. God addresses His Son as His only begotten. This passage predicts the anointed King—the Messiah—will smash the rebellious nations to pieces with an iron rod. The psalmist urges the kings and rulers of the earth to submit to the Son’s rule and come to friendly terms with Him. The psalm closes with the declaration that all who take refuge in the Lord’s anointed King are blessed.

Author: J. Palmer

Living under the wings of God and the angels around me keeping me going and safe. Sharing the love of Christ.

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