Come To Me As You Are

Matthew 11:28

New Living Translation

28 Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest.

Jesus living each loving way that he does said to the people

Come to me all of you who suffer carrying heavy burden and I will give you rest easing your mind and pain

Answer: 28 Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.Feb 15, 2019

https://www.therogersvillereview.com › …

WHAT DOES THE BIBLE

Matthew 11:28-30

The Word of God

Jesus said, “Come to me, all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• “Come” is a familiar word in scripture. “Come back to me; come and see; come follow me.” God continues to invite us, desiring what is best for us. This is the God who leads us to restful waters, who desires that work be service, not slavery. We are promised the help we need by a gentle and humble Lord to walk more lightly in life, knowing that he is with us.

• Do I hear the Lord’s invitation to me as life-giving and liberating? Where do I feel burdened or enslaved knowing the Lord desires freedom in service of him and others? I turn to the Lord for what I need to travel more lightly in life.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• This simple invitation goes straight to the heart. I spend time letting it echo within me, as I bring to Jesus all my weariness and heavy burdens, one by one.

• Learn from me; for I am gentle and humble in heart. One of the most popular titles for Jesus in the Gospel was that of Rabbi, teacher. Here he invites us to learn from him: he describes himself as gentle and humble. Were these the two qualities he liked most about himself, where he wants us to be most like him? I pray to be a good student of this unique teacher.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Jesus promises that when we are troubled, if we turn to him he will help us. Let us take him at his word.

• A yoke is always carried by two oxen. The reason Christ’s yoke is easy for us to carry is because he is carrying it with us, and taking most of the weight.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Jesus clearly declared that he had come to heal and lift up those who were ailing (saying that it’s the sick who need the doctor). In the past people had foreseen only a regime of punishment for waywardness.

• Basing themselves on the old punitive approach, the Pharisees had carried things further – setting up a whole system of laws and prohibitions. They had imposed a load (‘yoke’) on the people, said Jesus, and wouldn’t lift a finger to ease the load.

• The people, labouring under this kind of burden, longed for relief – and Jesus offers them rest : he is the one who has come to serve (‘humble in heart’), and is full of understanding (‘gentle’).

• Here we have a picture of what the relationship is like in the intimate family of Jesus and his adopted brothers and sisters : all of us are being raised up to be the best persons we can be.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• A yoke has traditionally been used between a pair of animals, usually oxen, to help them pull together on a load. Who is joined to me in this yoke? Surely it is Jesus himself!

• Jesus is not suggesting that we live free from any yoke. “And what is this yoke of yours that does not weary but gives rest?” asked the Jesuit Saint, Robert Bellarmine. “It is, of course, that first and greatest commandment: ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart.’”




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Here we see Jesus as the epitome of the Beatitudes for He presents Himself as “gentle and humble in heart”. We see this in the way that throughout the Gospels Jesus is comfortable with our limitations as human beings, and also in the way Jesus invites us to face the greatness He shares with us.

• Be with Jesus for some time as He invites you to rest with these two sides of yourself which He wants you to live happily with. In doing this Jesus promises that you will find “rest for your soul”.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Do I have anything weighing on me now? Jesus promises to help, and I believe him.

• Jesus’ yoke is his New Law, to love each other as he loves us. It is easy because he gives us the strength to carry it.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• I seek quiet in my heart so that I can listen to Jesus’ invitation to lay all my heavy burdens at his feet, and so find rest. Then I bring myself to respond, by accepting this invitation, going to him and taking my burdens one by one, becoming aware of my need to find rest.

• I ask him to make my heart like unto his, gentle and humble. I thank God for the gentleness and humility I notice in my heart, and ask for more, as I pray for the grace to be like Jesus in all my relationships, both in those that are easy and in the difficult ones.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• The reign of the coming saviour king will not just bring security and welcome to any persons who feel lost and abandoned. Jesus’ kingdom also promises relief and support to those who simply feel that life has become too much for them.

• Jesus understands each of us better than we understand ourselves, his heart – gentle and humble, goes out to us.

• One day Jesus will invite his band of first followers to come apart to a quiet place and to rest a while. They will feel at ease in his presence and be rejuvenated.

• This ‘rest’ – a sense of having been accepted, banishes weariness and renews our energy. No surprise here – the Saviour Lord himself happens to be the energy-centre of the universe, the creator – the one who drills the stars.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Since Jesus uttered this glorious invitation it has been a constant support to many people. Today, as I reflect on it let me be encouraged and comforted.

• I imagine Jesus saying these words to me, now. Jesus offers me rest for my soul. This invitation opens a refreshing space in my soul, by inspiring hope that God is always with me.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Jesus invites us to come to Him just as we are. He recognises the busyness of our lives, how we labour and are overburdened and draws us into his loving and gentle presence. He wants to listen to all of our troubles, and assures us that his yoke is easy and his burden is light. When we spend time with Jesus we find rest for our souls. He speaks to us in the silence of our hearts and gives us inner peace.

• We can speak with Jesus as we would with any friend, sharing our joys, our struggles, our hopes, and our fears. He never grows tired of listening to us and constantly renews us with the gift of his love. What do I want to share with him now in this time of prayer?




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• I am often weary, Lord, and my burden feels heavy on me. When I look at Christians, some of them indeed seem relaxed and easy in your company. Others appear uptight and driven, not restful people to be near.

• You are a gentle, humble presence. If I feel under pressure in prayer, something is wrong. It is a sign of your presence to me that my soul feels rested.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Sometimes we carry heavy burdens because we want to figure things out on our own, thinking there is no one to help us. I pray that people who are weighed down may hear the voice of Jesus. I pray that I may hear it too, and have the humility I need to ask for and to receive help.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• When the burden is so heavy that prayers cannot even be formed, lean on him. When you are too weary to lift your head, rest it on his shoulder, knowing that somehow your burden will be shared, lifted and eventually eased. He has said so, and he is faithful to his promises.

• Lord, let me share your work. Open my eyes to the burdens borne by others. Open my heart to the pain that cannot be shared, to the fear that cannot be spoken, to those who face darkness alone.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• A yoke is a wooden or iron frame which joins two oxen for the purpose of pulling a plough or cart. Here, Jesus invites us to share the burden of our worries and fears with him, since he is only too willing to help us cope with and manage them. It is an open invitation spoken to us by Jesus who is forever “gentle and humble in heart”.

• Jesus also invites his followers to ‘shoulder his yoke’ – the challenge of Christian discipleship and witness. ‘If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me’ (Luke 9:23). Lord, when my cross in life becomes too heavy, may I always look to you for help. May I, in turn, help others carry their crosses too.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• An old story describes Peter at the gates of heaven. The world has ended. The sheep have been separated from the goats; all the faithful are inside and Peter is preparing to close the gates. Then he sees Jesus standing outside. ‘Master’ he says, ‘what are you doing outside?’ Jesus replies, ‘I’m waiting for Judas.’ In the words of today’s reading, Jesus is calling directly to me: ‘Come to me’. Jesus will wait for me, too, beyond the end of time.

• What burdens weigh me down? Loneliness, illness, guilt, bereavement, depression, fear? What is preventing me handing these burdens to Jesus?




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• After his disturbing words about the danger of missing the point of true discipleship, Jesus concludes with a gracious invitation: ‘Come to me!’ Let me listen to Jesus whisper that call to me. He uses my name; his face shows his love; the tone of his voice is one of purest welcome. I relax in this. Perhaps I may use the phrase as my mantra today.

• Those who burden the weary are the religious leaders, with their emphasis on the Law. Jesus is not proposing a lax interpretation of the Law. But he interprets the Law in the context of love. The great command, he says, is that we should love God and neighbour, because God loves us all totally. Do I find ‘rest for my soul’ in this network of love?




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Most people would say that they are weary and weighed down with problems. Jesus offers himself as one who has his own burden, but is glad to shoulder my burden too.

• The yoke was originally a term for Roman oppression of the Jews. People felt crushed by Rome’s demands. Jesus promises that if I join in with him, he will not be oppressive. I ask to feel the lightness and energy that he offers me.




Resume Prayer

• Resume Prayer
Some thoughts on today’s scripture

• Lord, these lovely words are sometimes linked to a picture of you in pastel shades, in a montage of roses and golden light. But it takes strength and courage to remain gentle in face of false accusations and scheming enemies. It is you who are the strong one, not the screamers and war-mongers.




Resume Prayer

WHAT DOES THE BIBLE SAY? Matthew 11:28-30 explained

• Feb 15, 2019

Question: Please explain Matthew 11:28-30.

Answer:

28 Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

This passage of the Bible has always been viewed as Christ’s worldwide invitation and I think rightly so. There are a few things that I think we need to take a close look at as well as give some serious considerations as to what Jesus said and how that He worded His teaching.

Let’s consider just “why” Jesus said what he said in these verses of the Bible:

First of all in our society there is a “great need” for the cure for sin. Isaiah informs us that sin is outrageous and separates us from God (Isaiah 59:1-2). Then Paul tells us that all are under sin — thus the need for a cure (Romans 3:23). John alerts us that we cannot truthfully deny sin in our lives without being a liar (1 John 1:8 & 10). Paul again reports that the payment for sin is death — separation from God (Romans 6:23). Paul also advises that God is patient — but, we need to be careful here and not take advantage of His patience (1 Timothy 1:16). Last but not least Paul acquaints us with the fact that without God and Christ there is no hope for sin being cured in our lives (Ephesians 2:12-18).

Secondly, we see that Christ’s invitation is “universal” in nature — “all.” Paul tells us that God’s plan for salvation has appeared to all (Titus 2:11). Then Luke informs us that God is not a respecter of persons (Acts 10:34-35).

Thirdly we understand that this divine plan of salvation that Jesus invites us into is based on a “precious promise” — “I will give you rest.” We are informed that all who come to Christ through the Father will not be cast out (John 6:37). Then John tells us that with Christ we have peace — freedom from sin (John 14:17). Paul advises that righteous living results in a divine payment (Philippians 4:17). Lastly Peter reports that the Lord is not slack in fulfilling His promise (2 Peter 3:9).

Fourthly we must comprehend that in order to partake of the Lord’s invitation involves “action” on our part — “come unto me & take my yoke” Peter tells us the we must repent — change (2 Peter 3:9). Then we are advised that we must come to God through Christ (Hebrews 7:25). Matthew informs us that we must do the will of God (Matthew 7:21). Finally John plainly tells us that we must do His commandments in order to have right to life eternal and to be able to sit down with Jesus and rest a little while (Revelation 22:14).

Unauthorized access.

In conclusion: it is beneficial, for the salvation of our soul, to recognize that life is real and earnest, and the grave is not its goal; how we live now will determine where we live in eternity! “Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it” (Ecclesiastes 12:7 (KJV).

WHAT DOES THE BIBLE SAY? Matthew 11:28-30 explained

• Feb 15,2019

Question: Please explain Matthew 11:28-30.

Answer:

28 Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

This passage of the Bible has always been viewed as Christ’s worldwide invitation and I think rightly so. There are a few things that I think we need to take a close look at as well as give some serious considerations as to what Jesus said and how that He worded His teaching.

Let’s consider just “why” Jesus said what he said in these verses of the Bible:

First of all in our society there is a “great need” for the cure for sin. Isaiah informs us that sin is outrageous and separates us from God (Isaiah 59:1-2). Then Paul tells us that all are under sin — thus the need for a cure (Romans 3:23). John alerts us that we cannot truthfully deny sin in our lives without being a liar (1 John 1:8 & 10). Paul again reports that the payment for sin is death — separation from God (Romans 6:23). Paul also advises that God is patient — but, we need to be careful here and not take advantage of His patience (1 Timothy 1:16). Last but not least Paul acquaints us with the fact that without God and Christ there is no hope for sin being cured in our lives (Ephesians 2:12-18).

Secondly, we see that Christ’s invitation is “universal” in nature — “all.” Paul tells us that God’s plan for salvation has appeared to all (Titus 2:11). Then Luke informs us that God is not a respecter of persons (Acts 10:34-35).

Thirdly we understand that this divine plan of salvation that Jesus invites us into is based on a “precious promise” — “I will give you rest.” We are informed that all who come to Christ through the Father will not be cast out (John 6:37). Then John tells us that with Christ we have peace — freedom from sin (John 14:17). Paul advises that righteous living results in a divine payment (Philippians 4:17). Lastly Peter reports that the Lord is not slack in fulfilling His promise (2 Peter 3:9).

Fourthly we must comprehend that in order to partake of the Lord’s invitation involves “action” on our part — “come unto me & take my yoke” Peter tells us the we must repent — change (2 Peter 3:9). Then we are advised that we must come to God through Christ (Hebrews 7:25). Matthew informs us that we must do the will of God (Matthew 7:21). Finally John plainly tells us that we must do His commandments in order to have right to life eternal and to be able to sit down with Jesus and rest a little while (Revelation 22:14).

Unauthorized access.

In conclusion: it is beneficial, for the salvation of our soul, to recognize that life is real and earnest, and the grave is not its goal; how we live now will determine where we live in eternity! “Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it” (Ecclesiastes 12:7 (KJV).

Matthew 11:28-30 | Come to Jesus

MATTHEW

LISTEN NOW

Let’s open the Bible now. We’re going to be in Matthew 11:28-30, and we going to look at this amazing passage of scripture that tells us who Jesus is for us. It’s such an important thing to see because we carry around so many wrong or incomplete thoughts of who Jesus is, about how he thinks about us, interacts with us, treats us, and so forth.

If you were to describe to someone who didn’t know Jesus what the heart of Jesus is like, what would you say? Well, Matthew 11:28-30 is one really good answer.

28 Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

This is God’s word.

Introduction

If you’ve been around Refuge Church for a while, you know we begin every worship service the same way.

To all who are weary and need rest;

To all who mourn and long for comfort;

To all who feel worthless and wonder if God even cares;

To all who fail and desire strength;

To all who sin and need a savior;

This church opens wide her doors with a welcome from Jesus.

Why do we say that every week? Because before we do anything else together, we want to bring our deepest needs to Jesus, and sometimes we just need someone else to call out those needs for us. I’m always moved by those words. They always speak of something going on deep inside my heart. We can think of those words as our confession that we are always needy for grace and mercy. No matter what it looks like on the outside, we come weary and heavy laden just by living in this broken world. We come in need of a rest we cannot give ourselves, longing for gentleness in a yoke only found in Jesus, an easy one where the burden is light, and the rest is eternal.

Jesus offers himself to the real us, not some future version of ourselves, not some cleaned-up image of ourselves, but just plain old us. Weary. Mournful. Depressed. Anxious. Failing. Sinful. We come to him as we are, without any pretense, without anything in our hands to offer but need, asking him to convert our longing into reality, transform sorrow into joy, remove the guilt of sin by his blood, and give new life to those barely hanging on.

These three verses we’re looking at today are perfect for people like us because they show us the kind of heart Jesus has for us. Charles Spurgeon once pointed out that in all the gospels, this is the only place that Jesus himself speaks of what his own heart is like. Gentle and lowly. Not harsh and reactionary. Not easily put out and frustrated. Not ready to strike you down. He is the most understanding person in the world. As author Dane Ortlund says, “The posture most natural to him is not a pointed finger but open arms.” Gentle and lowly. Gentle enough for the worst of us and lowly enough for the humblest of us. We can’t actually be too needy for Jesus. He’s not put off by our neediness. I mean, we can think ourselves too good for Jesus, but we can never be too bad for him.

So, as we continue our season of prayer and “reset” as a church, I want us to just listen to who Jesus is—what his heart is for us. So let’s listen to his heart for us, which is his heart for our city, for our neighborhood, for our workplace, for our school, for this world. As we listen, we hear three things:

1. The invitation to Jesus (v. 28)

2. The pathway of Jesus (v. 29a)

3. The promise from Jesus (vv. 29b-30)

The Invitation to Jesus (v. 28)

Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

“Come to me…” Jesus doesn’t say “work toward me.” He doesn’t say, “earn me.” He doesn’t say, “deserve me.” He says, “come to me.”

What does it mean to come to Jesus? In this verse, the word come isn’t only a command; it’s also an exclamation. Pastor Ray Ortlund puts it this way. Jesus is saying something like, “Hey guys, I’m over here!” We’re running around everywhere, going from one place to another, trying to make our life work, and we’re just not noticing the gentle and lowly Savior sitting right before our eyes offering everything we’re longing for. The truth is, Jesus isn’t hard to find. He’s made himself available. And he wants to get our attention because who he is is the one thing we most need.

“Come” is a present tense command here. Jesus isn’t asking us to come tomorrow or the next day or someday out in the future, but today. Come today. Leave your self-reliant efforts today. Leave your sins today. Leave your burdens today, and come. Rest is here right now for you. Just come. In a world that demands our learning, our doing, our working before anything else, Jesus asks only first for our coming. Our new life begins right there—just by coming to him.

Yet even still, we find a way to complicate this, don’t we? We imagine some hard conditions, some preliminary work, some qualifications or prerequisites, but Jesus asks us only to come as we are, with all that we are. If we were to write this on his behalf, I think we might be tempted to put a filter after that first phrase, wouldn’t we? How would you write it? “Come to me ____.” Now, maybe we put a filter on that for others, but often we put a filter on it for ourselves. We think we can’t possibly come to Jesus. How could we? Look at us! But who gave us the right to add to God’s word, to change God’s word? What does Jesus say? “Come to me, all…” Jesus uses a word here big enough to include every type of sinner in the world, every type of sufferer in the world, a word so big and so inclusive that everyone who has ever lived fits inside of the “all.” The gospel Jesus brings is a worldwide invitation. It has no cultural limits or national limits or even sin limits.

Here are the only qualifications: “All who labor and are heavy laden…” Other translations read “All who are weary and heavy laden.” That’s a good translation too. If you’re working yourself to death trying to fix your life (labor) or if your life is weighed down by something outside your control (heavy laden) (Ortlund), Jesus calls you to himself. Isn’t that amazing? Here’s Jesus, the Lord of heaven and earth, the Creator of all things, the one who upholds the universe by the word of his power, offering himself to who? The worn out and pressed down, the weary and burdened. The needy. I mean, he could go anywhere. He could go to the powerful, the impressive, the might. But where does he go? To the needy. To the lowly. To the people who can’t figure life out and don’t know what else to do or where else to go. To the very people he must call to attention because they can’t seem to slow down enough to look his way. You and me. Us.

Here’s one amazing truth about the gospel that runs counter to every other religion: the needier you are, the more perfect you are for Jesus. There are no self-made Christians. There are only needy people who collapse at the feet of Jesus and let him lift them up.

If you are exhausted from working only to fail, from obeying only to sin again, from pushing the rock up the hill only to have it fall back on top of you, you are invited to Jesus. If you feel a heaviness on your heart that you want to be free of, sin or sorrow or anxiety or remorse or memories or uncertainties or whatever, you are invited to Jesus. The qualifications you need are weariness and weightiness. Your need is not a problem for Jesus. You are not adding some burden to him. He is there to unburden you. In fact, your burden is the very thing that delights him. He loves to care for you. You can trust him with who you really are because this passage tells us who he really is: gentle and lowly at heart.

So you can come to Jesus. And when you come to Jesus and entrust yourself into his care, he gives you something no one else can. Look again at verse 28. “Come to me…and I will give you rest.” Jesus says here something that actually only God can say. In fact, God did say it through the prophet Jeremiah in the Old Testament (35:21), “I will satisfy the weary soul, and every languishing soul I will replenish.” God didn’t just say something like that one time, he said it multiple times throughout the Old Testament. Here’s what Jesus is saying: he’s saying he is the God of Jeremiah, the God of the Old Testament, he is the God who promised rest and now has come to earth to accomplish the plan of salvation and give it in fullness to his people. Jesus isn’t asking you to deserve it—not way back when you first followed him or right now or ten years in the future when you still fall into sin. This entire passage rests on who Jesus is, not on us. He’s the one making promises. He’s just asking us to trust him, to come to him.

So when your life falls apart, this is a verse you can come to. When you can’t find rest anywhere else, here is Jesus your savior saying, “Come to me.” When all else fails, he never will. It’s an offer we can’t refuse. We’d be crazy to refuse it.

And as we come, Jesus never leaves us in the same place he found us. He always takes us on a journey with him, which is our second point.

The Pathway of Jesus (v. 29a)

Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart…

Now, given what we just saw, this verse is a bit surprising, isn’t it? Jesus offers rest and then immediately says, “Take my yoke upon you.” He didn’t say “Take my seat” or “Take my bed” or “Take my vacation.” He said, “Take my yoke.” What’s a yoke? A yoke is an agricultural term. Farmers place a yoke on animals to use their strength to plow fields. So, wait a minute. How does this make sense? How is a yoke the natural outflow of the rest that Jesus gives?

Well, notice how he calls it his yoke. Not a yoke. Not the law’s yoke. Not some other yoke. His yoke. “Take my yoke upon you.” The yoke of Jesus is vastly different from every other yoke. In verse 30 we see his yoke is easy. It’s not heavy. It’s light.

Now, we need to get something straight right away. There is no such thing as a yoke-less life. It’s just a matter of what we’re yoked to. Coming to Jesus is not a yoke-less life. One look at the Sermon on the Mount or his parables or the Great Commission should rid us of that thought. When we come to Jesus, we come to Jesus as we are, but he changes us into who he is. The yoke we receive from him is not like the yoke of the Pharisees who demanded strict obedience to man-made laws. It’s not the yoke of the world that demands constant change and evolution of views or else. Jesus’s yoke is easy; it’s light.

Jesus’s yoke is light for at least two reasons.

First, his yoke comes along with his teaching. “Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me.” To have his yoke means you will be working, and that’s a good thing, despite how it may sound at first. Work is not a result of the Fall. God gave Adam work before he sinned. It actually is part of who we are. We’re designed this way. As commentator Dan Doriani says, “The cure for a heavy burden is not to have no burden, but a light burden, the right burden. Jesus knows the right burden. He offers rest not by inviting us to do nothing, but by leading us to the right activities.” As we move forward as a church together Jesus will call us to work. He’ll call us to do hard things for him, even suffer for him. But isn’t working with Christ even in suffering better by far than living without him?

Second, his yoke isn’t heavy because of who he is. “For I am gentle and lowly in heart.” Here is what separates Jesus from everyone else. He is gentle and lowly.

The word gentle means pleasant, mild, soothing, friendly. It’s the opposite of rough, hard, and violent. Jesus is not out to get you. His most foundational disposition is not to destroy you, but you save you; not to strike you but to comfort you; not to do violence, but to be gentle. When we go the wrong way, he gently redirects. He doesn’t shame us. He doesn’t embarrass us. He gently leads us back to himself, back to the right path, to learn afresh from him, to see him again for who he is, and to fall in love with him all over again through how he loves us.

He’s also lowly. Jesus doesn’t need to be seen as impressive. He is impressive. So lowliness doesn’t bother him. The word lowly means weak, insignificant, servile. This was not a virtue even in Jesus’s day. It was looked down upon. Who in their right mind would be this way? Well, Jesus would. At his deepest core, Jesus is a servant. He came to serve and not to be served because that’s who he is at heart. He doesn’t mind stooping down to our level, getting inside our messes, dying for our sins. His heart is not limited to what we deserve; it rejoices to serve the unworthy, the guilty, the sinful, the wayward, his children.

We were made to be with God. So when we come to Jesus and take his yoke upon us, what we actually find is the kind of life we long to live, and we find it together. He becomes not just my savior or your savior but our savior. He joins us together and he begins to use us for his glory. We start getting involved in things we never could have imagined before for his sake. He shows us how to live for him. He carries the load, but he deploys us in mission. He sends out into his fields ripe for harvest to do his work in the world. He’s patient. He’s tender. He’s open. He’s accommodating. He’s understanding. When we stumble, he picks us up. When we can’t go on, he carries us. When we doubt him, he proves himself. When we fail, we get his success. When we sin, he’s already paid the penalty.

Here’s the amazing thing: Jesus is willing to be yoked to us, and we aren’t holding him back. Even more, he’s happy to be so. He longs to be so. Nothing in him shies away from us. No sin is too great. No weakness too much. No failure too excessive. He comes down to our low place and takes us to his high place. And he doesn’t mangle us on the way. He’s gentle. He knows our frame. He knows because he’s been in the weakness of flesh. But he never sinned, so his strength is far greater than ours. He knows the path, and he will teach us.

Jesus isn’t just talking the talk. He walked the walk. He entered in. He came. Would we imagine God would get down in the field with us and pull the plow? Would we imagine Jesus would make himself nothing to bring us to the Father? Would we imagine the gentleness and lowliness of God would be enough to save us from the strength and stronghold of sin? But so it is. The gentle and lowly Jesus is our Savior. He’s offering his yoke to teach us his ways, and he’s making a promise, which is our third point.

The Promise from Jesus (vv. 29b-30)

…and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

Here is the second time Jesus mentions rest. The first rest was an immediate rest from coming to him. This rest is the rest after the rest. The first rest is given, the second discovered. Yes, given also, but discovered along the way. The first is instant relief. The second is a lifelong journey. It’s the rest of a learner. The rest of the one who after receiving now serves alongside his master.

It’s not a physical rest. After all, there is a yoke involved. There is learning involved. Neither is easy. It demands something of us. Jesus doesn’t offer rest for our bodies. What he offers is rest for our souls.

Maybe we’d prefer rest for our bodies. So much of our life is driven by how our body feels. We fall asleep at night because our bodies can’t take any more. I don’t know about you, but even though I fall asleep, I’m always tired. I just got back from vacation. Hours in the car with four kids. Not easy. Laying down in my own bed for the first time in a week was like laying on clouds. My body needed it. But when my dog woke me up in the middle of the night and those thoughts that come out only in the darkness invaded my heart, it didn’t matter how my body felt. My soul needed rest. Yours does too.

Deep inside my soul, there is a need no amount of physical rest can alleviate. There are memories in my past that I don’t want to think about but from time to time they rise to the surface, reminding me that I’m not good at all. There are things I said, or things I didn’t say but should have. There are regrets that won’t fade away. There are wounds that time won’t heal. You know what I’m talking about because you have these things too.

What does Jesus have for us in the midst of that? Rest—at the deepest possible level, at the soul-ish level. Maybe we can’t live with ourselves after what we’ve done, but Jesus paid the penalty for us on the cross, and he’s not holding our sins over our heads. Maybe we can’t forget the pain of the past, but Jesus says that doesn’t have to be our future. He is preparing a place for us in our Father’s house. Maybe we can’t turn off the anxiety of another uncertain day, but Jesus says, “I’m already out there ahead of you. I know how this will end, and no matter what comes, no one can snatch you from my hands.”

We need a rest that stretches further than today. We need eternal rest. We need to know that we can’t ruin this some time out in the future. We need peace of heart—peace with God that lasts. We need a clear conscience. We need the removal of guilt. We need shame to disappear. And Jesus, through his life, death, and resurrection, offers it all. His salvation is total and complete, right now, for us!

Looking forward to Christ’s cross, in Jeremiah 31:34, God tells us what he thinks about his people because of Christ’s atonement. “I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.” God is not holding our sins over our heads. Jesus’s yoke is easy. Do you see the kindness in this? In fact, the word easy means kind. Jesus is kind to us. His yoke is therefore a kind of non-yoke. It’s not burdensome. It’s easy, kind. It’s the kind of thing that we just long to do—to come under him, to be shepherded by him, to follow him.

Who doesn’t need kindness? How kind Jesus our savior is! His kindness is seen most clearly in the cross. We were weighed down by the burden of sin. We could never obey God perfectly. In fact, we ruined our shot at perfection before we even had the capacity to understand what we did.

So what then is our hope? It’s Jesus! He came to be our substitute. When Jesus lived on earth, he obeyed God perfectly. He was the one single person in all history to actually earn God’s blessing by his obedience. And what did he do with it? He went to the cross to take God’s curse for sin. He did that for you. If Christ’s cross wasn’t at the center of history, there could be no offer of rest. If Jesus didn’t know for certain he would trade his blessing for our cursing, he would have been the greatest liar in the world to offer rest like this. But he could offer rest then and he can offer rest now because the wrath of God we’re owed for our sin has been fully satisfied in Christ on the cross. He has paid it all. And by coming to him, by accepting Jesus, you are free from the penalty for your sin. All that you deserve was given to Jesus on the cross, so all that Jesus deserves is given to you. Jesus earned eternal rest, and he graciously gives it to you and me just by coming to him.

You can have peace with God! Even if all the world stands against you, you can lay down at night and sleep well because God is for you. He takes great delight in you. He will quiet you with his love. He will rejoice over you with singing. (Zephaniah 3:17)

Once Jesus has become your Lord and Savior when those terrible memories pop up again, you can boldly apply the gospel to them. You don’t have to think about them anymore. You don’t have to keep beating yourself up. Maybe you need to apologize to someone, but because of Christ’s cross, you are at peace with God the moment you repent and come to Jesus by faith. You’re free from the past. You’re free in the present. You will be free in the future. You have rest for your soul.

That’s why Jesus says his yoke is easy and his burden is light. He’s not saying life won’t be hard. There is still a cross to be carried. There will be trials. Jesus promised us that. We have battles to fight and hardships to bear and sufferings to endure. Jesus is not discounting that. What he is saying is that the comforts of the gospel outweigh them all.

Jesus offers rest we never thought possible. When we come to him, we come to the answer of our life’s pursuit. It’s him. The most loving, accessible, approachable, kind, gentle, and lowly person in the universe. He’s our Savior. He’s our Lord. He’s our rest.

Conclusion

So let me close with this. Why am I talking about this in this season that we’re in as a church? Simply this: coming to Jesus moment by moment is the only future we have together. How could it be otherwise? He’s our leader. He’s our Savior. He’s our Lord. He’s our master. He’s the one we follow. We go where ever the Lamb leads.

If we don’t receive the real Jesus in his own words, we will be harsh, unkind, and restrictive. It’s just who we naturally are. Thankfully, we are not that way here at Refuge, but let’s not think we couldn’t be.

If we continue to receive the real Jesus in his own words and keep receiving him moment by moment together, there is no end to the joy and love and peace and harmony and risk-taking and cross-bearing that we can experience together with him.

Also, next week we are celebrating new life through baptism. If you’ve never been baptized maybe this passage will compel you to come to Jesus for new life.

All he’s asking is for us to come. Just stop running everywhere else and come to him. Let’s take his yoke upon us, for he is gentle and lowly at heart. The rest we never thought possible is ours in Christ our Savior.

What does Matthew 11:28 mean? [ See verse text ]

Jesus has made an extraordinary claim and now He makes an extraordinary offer to all who hear Him. He claimed in the previous verse to be the only one who knows God the Father and to be able to reveal the Father to anyone He chooses (Matthew 11:25–27). Now He makes an invitation: if you’re struggling and tired, I can give you relief.

Here is the implication. Jesus’ Jewish listeners were engaged in a mighty struggle to know God the Father. Their religious leaders had placed enormous burdens on them (Matthew 23:4), and they were laboring to carry those burdens in hopes of being approved by God. Jesus has just said that He can reveal His Father to anyone, and He immediately offers rest to everyone who is weighed down.

Jesus is not talking about physical rest, necessarily. The following verse will describe it as rest for the soul. The path to the Father through Jesus is not one of weary labor and heavy work. Jesus’ earlier analogy about the path to life being narrow and “difficult” (Matthew 7:14) is entirely separate, and speaking from a different perspective. From the view of the world, following Christ means taking on difficult circumstances and giving up worldly pleasures. From the view of eternity—of salvation—following Christ means giving up the impossible task of carrying our own sin.

Christ does not say it here, but the gospel will reveal that Jesus is offering to carry the burden and do the work in order to lead those who come to Him—those who are “yoked” to Him—to the Father (Matthew 11:30; John 6:29).

Context Summary

Matthew 11:25–30 begins with Jesus’ prayer of thanks to His Father for hiding the truth from those thought to be wise by the world’s standards. Instead, the gospel has been revealed to those the unbelieving world dismisses as virtual children. Jesus declares that He and the Father know each other completely and that He can reveal the Father to anyone He chooses. He offers rest for the souls of all who are weighed down and weary if they will take on His yoke, saying that His burden is easy and light.

Chapter Summary

John the Baptist sends his disciples to ask if Jesus is really the Messiah. Jesus gives them a specific answer to use to reassure John and then upholds John to the crowds. John fulfills the prophecy about the one who would prepare the people for the Messiah. This generation, though, refused to hear John or Jesus, deciding John had a demon and Jesus was a glutton and drunkard. Jesus condemns the cities that refuse to repent and thanks the Father for revealing the truth to little children. He offers rest for those who are weary and burdened.

What Does Matthew 11:28 Mean? ►

Come to Me all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Matthew 11:28(MKJV)

Verse Thoughts
The heavy yoke of bondage to sin is a weighty burden we all have to carry on the treadmill of life, which causes physical weariness, spiritual fatigue, and emotional exhaustion. But Christ’s invitation to “COME – Come to Me all you who labour and are heavy laden,” brings rest to the weary, comfort for the hurting, solace to the heavily laden, and rest for the soul.

Although this gracious invitation to ‘come’ in the Gospel of Matthew, is offered to all people, it was initially given by Jesus to Israel. He was born of a Jewish virgin into the Jewish race, as foretold by Jewish prophets. He was the Jewish Messiah Who was born of the royal line of Israel’s great king David. He came to the lost sheep of the house of Israel in fulfilment of Scripture, calling the entire nation to repent of their sin, return to the Lord, and trust HIM as Saviour.

However, this offer was made to an unresponsive and unrepentant generation, who were more interested in their temporal needs being met than their spiritual needs. Jesus presented His faultless, Messianic credentials which were authenticated by His mighty signs and wonders, but His offer was refused. He was despised by men, hated by the Jewish leaders, and rejected by those He came to save.

0 seconds of 15 seconds
This ad will end in 3
 
Israel did not recognise the time of their visitation and Jesus reached a point in His ministry when He transferred His attention from the nation as a whole, to individuals who believed in Him. They were called to separate themselves from national Israel and follow Him.

This is possibly the pivotal point when Christ’s Messianic offer to the lost sheep of the whole house of Israel changed… to a call for individual believers to COME. This was the time Jesus stopped offering the kingdom to national Israel, began to teach in parables, and started to turn his undivided attention to believing individuals who laboured and were heavy laden… and invited them to come to Him for rest.

Jesus is the well-spring of Life and the Light that has come into the world to give hope to all who will trust on His name for salvation, and His invitation to ‘COME’ is for whosoever will. Christ alone is the One Who can heal the hurting, rescue the perishing, and save a sinner from eternal separation from our heavenly Father – for there is no other name given among men whereby we must be saved.

Jesus came to show us the Father, for He is the incarnate God, and the one who has seen the Son has seen the Father. Those who know the Son, know the Father. He shines forth the radiance of the glory of God, for He is the exact image of the essence of God and upholds all things by the word of His power. He is the visible representation of the glorious, eternal, invisible God, who has invited us all to COME.

The invitation to ‘come’ is from Jesus and contains no limitations or restrictions. He will turn no one away. There is no need to stand afar off because Christ calls ALL to draw close to Him. He alone can lift the heavy yoke of bondage to sin which weighs down the burdened heart. He alone can heal the broken-hearted, rescue those that are perishing, and set the captive free from the weighty burden of sin. And His invitation is open to ALL who will believe on His name.

‘Come To Me’ is an invitation for the broken-hearted soul and burdened sinner. COME, just as you are. “Come unto Me, all you who labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” This promise of rest that Jesus offers is a rest that He freely gives to all who will come to Him for salvation.

The rest that Christ gives, is an eternal rest beyond our understanding that can never be earned or purchased. The rest He offers, is freely available as God’s gift of grace to whosoever will COME. “Come to Me, ALL who labour and are heavy laden

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/matthew-11-28

Author: J. Palmer

Living under the wings of God and the angels around me keeping me going and safe. Sharing the love of Christ.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

SW Altair

in these quiet small hours of the night

Go Forth In Faith

We are a young church of Bible Believers who are dedicated in reading Gods word and sharing the gospel in Miami FL and beyond.

Oscar Hokeah

Writer of Literary Fiction

Devoted Heart Ministries

Mute. Deaf. All Disabilities. Living with hope in Jesus.

HevnSwtAngels Blog

Seeing the world through an Angels Eyes

GoForthInFaithMinistries

LivingWaterMinistries, lifewaterministries.wordpress.com, lifewaterministries

Poems for Warriors

"He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds." Ps 147:3

God Listens And Hears

Smile! You’re at the best WordPress.com site ever

Wild Like the Flowers

Rhymes and Reasons

Smoke words every day.

The home of poetry

LUNA

Pen to paper

Devotional Treasures

Christian devotional reading. Bible discoveries. Gems from the Word of God for everyday life.

Bombay Ficus

Running, Writing, Real Life Experiences & Relatable Content.

BE BLESSTIFIED!

Original, daily devotionals, inspiration and more from a fresh, "Hey! I never thought about it like that before" perspective.

The Christian Faith Blog

Inspiring YOU to Love, Seek and Know the Ways of The Lord.

Burrislife

Bible truths to encourage hearts.

%d bloggers like this: