The Salt Of The Earth

VERSE OF THE DAY

Matthew 5:11-12 (New Living Translation)

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“God blesses you when people mock you and persecute you and lie about you and say all sorts of evil things against you because you are my followers. Be happy about it! Be very glad! For a great reward awaits you in heaven. And remember, the ancient prophets were persecuted in the same way.

Matt. 5 Verses 11 to 12

[11] Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. [12] Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

“God blesses you when people condemn you and make fun of you in mockery and persecute you lie about you and say all sorts of evil things against you because you are my faithful followers of Jesus For a great reward awaits you in heaven. And remember, the ancient prophets were persecuted in the same way.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_5:11

October 27, 2017

Matthew 5:11-12

Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you. – Matthew 5:11-12

Dear Jesus,

It always feels so lonely to be disliked by someone.  You knew that feeling your entire ministry on earth.  You told us that you were not alone because your Father was with you. (John 8)  Your words here in the last beatitude help me realize that you are with me too.  When people speak against us Christians I can think, “Hey, I am good company.”  Help me keep the goal of glorifying your name in front of others instead of avoiding persecution.  When it’s time to take a stand, give me the strength to rise to my feet.  Make me a bold witness for your gospel and a beacon for truth. Help me to care less about what people think of me and care more about how much they think of you. 

AMEN

When we live for Christ, we will experience the same social challenges he did.  

What does Matthew 5:11 mean?

This is part of Jesus’ explanation of the Beatitudes: a series of statements about those who are “blessed,” as proven by certain attitudes or actions (Matthew 5:1–9). In the previous verse, Jesus mentioned those who endured persecution for the sake of righteousness (Matthew 5:10). Here, He adds details about what persecution might look like and what might cause it. For the first time, Jesus moves away from general statements, given to His largely Jewish audience, and focuses more narrowly on Himself, specifically, as the One they are following.

The central issue in true Christian “persecution” is, of course, Jesus Christ. Merely being harassed or treated unfairly isn’t necessarily persecution—especially if it’s in response to our own wrongdoing (1 Peter 4:15). What Jesus means is that one proof of being “blessed” is willingness to endure unfair treatment on account of faithfully following Him (1 Peter 4:12–14). Those in opposition to Jesus might insult His followers, abuse them, and falsely accuse them of doing terrible things.

At the time Jesus gives the Sermon on the Mount, this hasn’t yet happened to those who follow Him. However, this blessing serves as an early warning that such abuse is coming (John 16:1–4). In the following verse, Jesus will continue to explain why those who suffer for being connected to Him are blessed.

Context Summary

Matthew 5:1–12 contains the beautiful Beatitudes delivered by Jesus in His Sermon on the Mount. The series of nine sentences describes an unlikely group of people as blessed: the poor in spirit, those who mourn, the meek, those hungry for righteousness, and the merciful. All are blessed because of their part in the kingdom of heaven. This includes those persecuted for the sake of righteousness and on account of Jesus. Instead of despairing, they should rejoice for the great rewards they will receive in heaven. These are not prerequisites for salvation; instead, they are the natural expressions of saving faith in the life of those who know Christ.

Chapter Summary

The Sermon on the Mount contains some of Jesus’ most challenging teaching. It begins with the unlikely blessings of the Beatitudes. Jesus’ disciples must do good works in order to be a powerful influence: as the salt of the earth and light of the world. The superficial righteousness of the Pharisees is not good enough to earn heaven. Sins of the heart, such as angry insults and intentional lust, are worthy of hell just as much as adultery and murder. Easy divorce and deceptive oaths are forbidden. Believers should not seek revenge. Instead, God intends us to love our enemies and pray for our persecutors. In short, we should strive to be perfect, as God is perfect

What Does Matthew 5:13 Mean? ►

“You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled under foot by men.

Matthew 5:13(NASB)

Verse Thoughts

The Church is the body of Christ and in His absence from the world we are called to be the salt of the earth and yet we are also warned that if salt loses it saltiness it is good for nothing, other than to be thrown out and trampled under foot.

Then as now salt has a number of important purposes. This was especially so in the time of Christ, when synthetic alternatives and refrigeration were unavailable. One use for salt is to add flavour to food while another important use is for preservation – preventing the putrefaction and spoiling of food.

The audience for Christ’s sermon on the mount, was not the lost sheep of the house of Israel, but His own, chosen disciples. Christ’s instruction to be salt was given to those that believed in His name – and the important lesson it teaches is that the presence of true, spiritual believers can make a real difference to a lost and dying world.

But there is also a secondary message which is a warning to all believers – that valuable opportunities to make a difference in our world can be lost.. through careless carnality or a lukewarm Christian life, which causes us to end up living a life that is good for nothing.

This is not a verse that is addressed to unbelievers on how to be saved… but a verse that instructs those who have already been saved by grace on how to live. This is not a verse that is warning believers that they can lose their eternal Salvation, but one that alerts those who have trusted Christ as Saviour that they need to be a sweet seasoning in the lives of unbelievers.. and also that they act as a preservative in a putrefying world – for to do so will bring with it a great reward.

We are in the world but not of the world and we must never allow the world to shape us into its own mold. We are to be seasoning in a bland, insipid and corrupted world. Our words are to be seasoned with salt by speaking the truth of the glorious gospel of grace with those who are dead in their sins. We are to be a preserving agent that is used by God to restrain this world’s evil from spreading its cancerous fingers into the lives of those who need to trust in Christ as Saviour.

Let us take up our cross and lay hold of these important instructions that Jesus gave to his disciples – to be the salt of the earth. And let us beware that we do not lose our saver by walking in tandem with the world and living a lukewarm Christian life – but rather let us live our life unto the Lord and to His praise and glory.. so that we may not waste this life of ours.. but be a worthy witness to the goodness and grace of our heavenly Father, Who loved the world so much that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him would not perish but have everlasting life.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/matthew-5-13

Author: J. Palmer

Living under the wings of God and the angels around me keeping me going and safe. Sharing the love of Christ.

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