Purify Me From My Sin

Psalm 51:2

New Living Translation

Wash me clean from my guilt.

    Purify me from my sin.

We live in a world that seems to be Satan’s playground where Sin is known okay. However sin is never okay it is against God the most high this is the reasoning behind God sending Jesus, the son to die on the cross to purify us(me) erasing all sins washing clean of the sins we partake in everyday by being human. Sin is not okay God knew we were doomed unless Jesus died for all of us. I can only speak for myself and my feelings, but if you live for Christ and are someone who lives with heart you should feel things about performing sin. You should feel a form of wrongdoing and guilt. If you don’t then you must be a very dark human. If you do then you should relate to this scripture that is saying

Wash me clean from my guilt.

    Purify me from my sin.

Because sin in God’s eyes is never okay it has never been okay and it should not feel okay if you a god fearing. You should find yourself feeling horrible doing wrong and find yourself asking God to wash you clean and forgive you while dealing the guilt for sinning against God asking him to purify you from sin you have done and trying to walk with God instead of in your ways, the way of thee world.

Verse Thoughts

The psalms, prayers and praises of David have been a source of comfort and encouragement to multitudes down the corridors of history, and this Psalm, where David cries out to God for forgiveness of his sins, has demonstrated the importance and wisdom of confessing our sins – particularly our post-salvation sins – for in so doing we are immediately returned into a right relationship with the Father. For IF we confess our sins He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Every sin removes the believer from sweet fellowship with God, but telling Him our transgressions, through our only mediator, the Lord Jesus Christ – which is the right and privilege of all believers in Christ Jesus, returns us immediately into sweet fellowship with the Father.

But although this like other psalms, prayers and praises of David is an ever-present source of comfort and encouragement to all believers, and rightly so – this verse is a prayer that the Christian can never pray, for in so doing it demonstrates a lack of understanding of the permanent, indwelling ministry of the Holy Spirit, in the life of ALL believers – following Christ’s finished work on Calvary’s cross.

This prayer of David was a prayer that he needed to pray, for prior to the cross the indwelling ministry of the Holy Spirit was only for certain people in Israel, such as their kings / prophets / selected individuals, and He was given for a specific ministry – and He would leave when their task was completed or if that believer sinned – as was typified in the life of king Saul. But this is very different from the permanently indwelling ministry of the Holy Spirit in the life of ALL believers, since He was sent, by Christ, at Pentecost.

The psalms, prayers and praises of David are a wonderful source of comfort and encouragement, but we must never confuse the way God dealt with His chosen people Israel – PRE-Cross, and His chosen people the Church – POST-cross. The Church has not replaced Israel but for the time-being God is working through His Body – the church and one of the many blessings that have been given to ALL believers, is the permanent, indwelling Holy Spirit for all time and into eternity.

Source: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/psalm-51-11

What does Psalm 51:2 mean?

In this verse David continues asking God to forgive his sin. He pleads with God to wash him completely from his iniquity and to cleanse him from his sin. His sin had made him feel as defiled as someone who had touched something unclean, or as helpless as someone touched by a disease (Leviticus 11:32; 13:1–3). He longed to have a new start in life, like a person who washed and put on new, clean clothes (Genesis 45:21–22; Exodus 19:10, 14).

In his letter to the Ephesians the apostle Paul referred to the believer’s former life of sin as “the old self” and the redeemed life as “the new self.” Like changing their clothes, the Ephesian Christians were exhorted to “put off your old self, which belongs to your former manner of life and is corrupt through deceitful desires…and to put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:22, 24).

Context Summary

Psalm 51:1–7 is David’s plea for mercy and cleansing. He admits he has sinned against God. His approach to confession is to take God’s attitude toward sin. He sees his sins as transgressions, iniquity, evil, and the result of his lifelong offensive nature. First John 1:9–10 corresponds to this passage by teaching believers to confess their sins—to agree with God’s stance about those sins—with the promise of God’s forgiveness and cleansing.

Chapter Summary

This psalm opens with David’s plea to God to show him mercy. He asks God to blot out his transgressions, wash his iniquities, and cleanse him from sin. He admits his sinning was against God. He also confesses his human sin nature. David asks God to make him as white as snow by purging him with hyssop. He longs for joy to return to him, but knows he was suffering because God had turned away from him. He pleads with God for a clean heart and a right spirit. He does not want God to cast him aside and remove His Holy Spirit. David longs for a renewal of the joy of his salvation. If cleansing from sin occurred and joy returned to him, David would teach transgressors God’s ways, and sinners would be converted. He promises near the end of the psalm to declare God’s praise if God would forgive him. He knew it would be futile to offer a sacrifice to God, because God delights in a broken and contrite heart and not in sacrifices offered with an unrepentant heart. David closes the psalm with a prayer for God to bless Jerusalem

Author: J. Palmer

Living under the wings of God and the angels around me keeping me going and safe. Sharing the love of Christ.

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